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Author Topic: 500/compound (Read 417 times)

JohnN

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500/compound
on: December 07, 2017, 04:45:28 PM
Recently asked DV8 the steps in bringing my Grudge Pearl to 500/compound finish and they said 500 grit pad on 4 sides and then compound. If refinishing start at 360. Saw a video on the "wow,that's Radical" Facebook page and Mo says 500, 2000, and then compound to bring a ball back to 500/compound. The reason being that the factory uses high speed high pressure equipment. Do you think the 2000 step is necessary or does the compound take care of that ? P.s> using a spinner.

notclay

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Re: 500/compound
Reply #1 on: December 08, 2017, 03:02:18 AM
Personally, I like skipping from 500 directly to the compound because I can get the ball to actually read the mid-lane AND finish.  Each (abrasive) step you add between the 500 and the compound will add length before the ball makes a change of direction (in my experience).  I bowl on a few house shots that can be rather slick, especially inside of 10 board.
 
Think of it as a tire with new treads.  Every step with an abrasive (before compound) will slightly wear off some of that tread, thus affecting how well the cover can displace oil and grip the lane surface.  Even the lane surface itself, assuming friction, can smooth out those "micro-treads" in less time than we realize.


Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 03:04:12 AM by notclay
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scotts33

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Re: 500/compound
Reply #2 on: December 08, 2017, 08:02:09 AM
I agree with Lane.  Also factor in amount of time and pressure with spinner and you can take a ball successively very fine grit with a compound. 

Personally, I kind of like Neo-Tac Hook Plus refreshing a cover if you need a 2500 compound finish by hand not spinner. 

Scott

JohnN

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Re: 500/compound
Reply #3 on: December 08, 2017, 08:40:58 AM
Is it my imagination or did he use a lot of compound ? I have a spinner and do 4 sides using about a 25 cent dollop per side.

Aloarjr810

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Re: 500/compound
Reply #4 on: December 08, 2017, 09:24:31 AM
Recently asked DV8 the steps in bringing my Grudge Pearl to 500/compound finish and they said 500 grit pad on 4 sides and then compound. If refinishing start at 360. Saw a video on the "wow,that's Radical" Facebook page and Mo says 500, 2000, and then compound to bring a ball back to 500/compound. The reason being that the factory uses high speed high pressure equipment. Do you think the 2000 step is necessary or does the compound take care of that ? P.s> using a spinner.

Well according to MO yes the 2000 grit step is needed to to reproduce by hand on  a spinner the 500/ Crown Factory Compound factory surface.

That's because the high speed high pressure equipment will produce a smoother surface than you can by hand on a spinner (which would be considered low speed low pressure equipment) only doing the same 2 steps.

The extra 2000 grit step compensates for this by making the surface slightly smoother before adding the compound.

Though the only way to really know if you matched the OOB is if you had a surface scanner.

Quote
Is it my imagination or did he use a lot of compound ? I have a spinner and do 4 sides using about a 25 cent dollop per side.

As for how much compound is used, in most videos where guys from companys are demoing compounds/polishing.

They use a lot of compound because their in a hurry and can afford to waste it.

Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 09:27:49 AM by Aloarjr810
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charlest

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Re: 500/compound
Reply #5 on: December 08, 2017, 12:53:11 PM
Keep in mind that applying compounds, like Crown Factory Compound, requires a large amount of human intervention, thus, producing an equally large amount of variability. That implies that until one gathers enough experience applying such (the same amount of compound, the same hand pressure, using the same applicator, spinning for the same amount of time [see the number of variables growing?]), results are going to vary as well.

That said, Crown compound contains a very aggressive abrasive. Usually applying it over any grit level of 1500 grit or greater is going to result in a polished visual appearance. So, for all practical purposes, you might as well have applied a true polish to begin with. For this reason, unless you have a lot of experience using CC, I'd strongly suggest applying it over a 500 grit base.

If you apply a little at a time (nickel to quarter size), doing 4 sides and use a decent micro-fiber towel or other similar pad (like the back of a used Abralon pad) to apply it, you can easily see what the results are as you go along. I'd suggest using a wet, strong paper towel, like Bounty, to clean off the residue, to see what you have each time you stop.
Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 12:55:04 PM by charlest
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scotts33

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Re: 500/compound
Reply #6 on: December 08, 2017, 01:02:01 PM
Keep in mind that applying compounds, like Crown Factory Compound, requires a large amount of human intervention, thus, producing an equally large amount of variability. That implies that until one gathers enough experience applying such (the same amount of compound, the same hand pressure, using the same applicator, spinning for the same amount of time [see the number of variables growing?]), results are going to vary as well.

That said, Crown compound contains a very aggressive abrasive. Usually applying it over any grit level of 1500 grit or greater is going to result in a polished visual appearance. So, for all practical purposes, you might as well have applied a true polish to begin with. For this reason, unless you have a lot of experience using CC, I'd strongly suggest applying it over a 500 grit base.

If you apply a little at a time (nickel to quarter size), doing 4 sides and use a decent micro-fiber towel or other similar pad (like the back of a used Abralon pad) to apply it, you can easily see what the results are as you go along. I'd suggest using a wet, strong paper towel, like Bounty, to clean off the residue, to see what you have each time you stop.

Good post Jeff!  There is such a long term learning curve with spinner usage it probably took me 5-6 years before I got very adept with the ole Vertex. 

Side note.....To refresh covers before every set I have taken to using "ICE" pads.  1500, 2000, 3000 love them and find the wear ability factor is great and don't see much variation between times of usage.  Cost per pad per use is less than SIAair or abralon IMO.  On edit....I should say I use the "ICE" pads by hand across the track for the most part not with a spinner which removes more material and you will over time get less life from a ball.  By hand is plenty of surface for me and more a true starting 1500, 2000 or 3000 which ever I choose for the condition I am bowling on.
Last Edit: December 08, 2017, 01:11:28 PM by scotts33
Scott