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Author Topic: Scotch-Brite  (Read 691 times)

djazmin

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Scotch-Brite
« on: July 02, 2003, 07:25:51 PM »
Has anyone used scotch-brite to alter the surface of a ball? If so, would you share how you've used it? Just wondering what the grit equivalent is. I have read somewhere that there are different kinds of scotch-brite, not just green. If true, what are the grit differences? Also, do you use a polish after? Thanks for any input.

 

MI 2 AZ

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Re: Scotch-Brite
« Reply #1 on: July 03, 2003, 10:49:30 AM »
Just do a search for "Scotch brite grit" on this site and you will find many recent posts.

Below is one from Charlest:

 
quote:
3M Scotch Brite:

7445 - White pad, called Light Duty Cleansing - 1200-1500 grit
7448 - Light Grey, called Ultra Fine Hand - 1000 grit.
7447 - Maroon pad, called General Purpose Hand - 320 grit
6444 - Brown pad, called Extra Duty Hand - 240 grit
7446 - Dark Grey pad, called Blending Pad - 150 grit
Green Scotch Brite is available EVERYWHERE. It's 600 grit.

The Blue pad is a recent discovery. I've found it on pot scrubbers, saying it will not scratch teflon and non-stick finishes. So 800 is a good guess for its grit level.

 


Also remember reading something from 10 In The Pit (I think) who said that using Scotch Brite dry would cut finer and using it wet would cut heavier.

Hope this helps.
_________________________________________
Half a century of bowling and still learning.

Need bowling information? - Please check this:  BR FAQ

charlest

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Re: Scotch-Brite
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2003, 07:42:19 PM »
Omigawd! I've been quoted. Now I can die a happy man.
Thanks, MI_2_AZ.

djazmin,

Always, but always use water, just to cut down on the coverstock dust you breathe in; it ain't good for ya!

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"Those who do not remember history are doomed to repeat it."
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

djazmin

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Re: Scotch-Brite
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2003, 07:59:52 PM »
Thanks for the input. I just used the green scotch-brite on my Wicked BRT, put in on a spinner and applied very light pressure for about 10 sec. I sprayed water before taking the dust off. Now the ball is dull. I applied hook-it and still the ball looks dull. I am going to try it tonight and see how it reacts.
The box says 600 grit cross hatched sanded buff with compound. Any suggestions for what compound I should use. I am thinking of finesse-it, though I already have renew-it. Also, were my sequence right? Again thanks for any input.

duggre

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Re: Scotch-Brite
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2003, 08:29:41 PM »
I do believe 3M discontinued the 6444 pad(brown). Because
of the grit or scratch ability being to close to the maroon
and gray pad.  Duggre/Vertex

charlest

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Re: Scotch-Brite
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2003, 09:14:43 PM »
quote:
Thanks for the input. I just used the green scotch-brite on my Wicked BRT, put in on a spinner and applied very light pressure for about 10 sec. I sprayed water before taking the dust off.


Not quite the method I had in mind. Sorry; should have been more explicit.

This applies, as far as I know, to any material used to "sand" bowling balls.

First, wet the ball and/or or the material (sandpaper or Scotch-Brite pad) with
a spray of water (the finer the spray the better; old CLEAN windex bottles; lens cleaners will do fine). Then turn on spinner; then apply pressure with the "material".

The idea is to dampen the surface of the ball with a mist of water. The water acts like a lubricant between the ball's cover and the sanding material. This makes the cuts more even and smooth; it also prevents the sanding material from wearing away too quickly plus prevents too much material from being removed from the ball at one time.

It's like oil when using an Arkansas stone to sharpen a knife.

The water also helps to prevent the fine ball coverstock dust from flying up into the air and your breathing it in.


--------------------
"Those who do not remember history are doomed to repeat it."
"None are so blind as those who will not see."