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Author Topic: Technique for going from higher to lower grit (Read 976 times)

mduminiak

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Technique for going from higher to lower grit
on: February 23, 2018, 06:06:25 PM
I have a ball that is currently at 4000 grit and would like to change the surface to 2000 grit. I have a ball spinner and abralon pads, and was wondering what the correct technique would be to alter the surface? Can I just use a 2000 pad, or do I need to take the surface to a much lower grit (e.g. 500) and then use a 2000 pad? Thanks.

SVstar34

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #1 on: February 23, 2018, 06:10:35 PM
When using a spinner I like to go lower grit first.

You could also just take the 2000 pad by hand lightly without using the spinner
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charlest

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #2 on: February 23, 2018, 07:21:05 PM
I have a ball that is currently at 4000 grit and would like to change the surface to 2000 grit. I have a ball spinner and abralon pads, and was wondering what the correct technique would be to alter the surface? Can I just use a 2000 pad, or do I need to take the surface to a much lower grit (e.g. 500) and then use a 2000 pad? Thanks.

If the ball/surface is at 500/1000/2000/4000 grit, then, yes, just taking a fresh 2000 grit to it, dampened, and by hand, you can take it to 2000 grit.

If the ball is at 500/4000 grit, then just be aware that by taking a 2000 grit to it, it is now at 500/2000 grit. That is different from 500/1000/2000 grit.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

mduminiak

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #3 on: February 23, 2018, 07:38:13 PM
I have a ball that is currently at 4000 grit and would like to change the surface to 2000 grit. I have a ball spinner and abralon pads, and was wondering what the correct technique would be to alter the surface? Can I just use a 2000 pad, or do I need to take the surface to a much lower grit (e.g. 500) and then use a 2000 pad? Thanks.

If the ball/surface is at 500/1000/2000/4000 grit, then, yes, just taking a fresh 2000 grit to it, dampened, and by hand, you can take it to 2000 grit.

If the ball is at 500/4000 grit, then just be aware that by taking a 2000 grit to it, it is now at 500/2000 grit. That is different from 500/1000/2000 grit.


The ball is currently at 500/4000. The final surface that I want is 500/2000, so going directly to 2000 sounds like the right approach. Why would it make sense to alter the surface by hand rather than using the ball spinner? Wouldn't the ball spinner produce a more consistent finish?

HackJandy

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #4 on: February 23, 2018, 08:20:10 PM
I have a ball that is currently at 4000 grit and would like to change the surface to 2000 grit. I have a ball spinner and abralon pads, and was wondering what the correct technique would be to alter the surface? Can I just use a 2000 pad, or do I need to take the surface to a much lower grit (e.g. 500) and then use a 2000 pad? Thanks.

If the ball/surface is at 500/1000/2000/4000 grit, then, yes, just taking a fresh 2000 grit to it, dampened, and by hand, you can take it to 2000 grit.

If the ball is at 500/4000 grit, then just be aware that by taking a 2000 grit to it, it is now at 500/2000 grit. That is different from 500/1000/2000 grit.


The ball is currently at 500/4000. The final surface that I want is 500/2000, so going directly to 2000 sounds like the right approach. Why would it make sense to alter the surface by hand rather than using the ball spinner? Wouldn't the ball spinner produce a more consistent finish?

I usually do last surface touch ups after sessions by hand to reduce the how much surface I take off the ball over the long run.  All polish and full resurfaces I use a spinner.  If changing the grit from before probably worth using the spinner.

(edit:  see Charlest answer below.  He knows surface like few others.)
Last Edit: February 23, 2018, 11:33:58 PM by HackJandy
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charlest

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #5 on: February 23, 2018, 09:33:58 PM
I have a ball that is currently at 4000 grit and would like to change the surface to 2000 grit. I have a ball spinner and abralon pads, and was wondering what the correct technique would be to alter the surface? Can I just use a 2000 pad, or do I need to take the surface to a much lower grit (e.g. 500) and then use a 2000 pad? Thanks.

If the ball/surface is at 500/1000/2000/4000 grit, then, yes, just taking a fresh 2000 grit to it, dampened, and by hand, you can take it to 2000 grit.

If the ball is at 500/4000 grit, then just be aware that by taking a 2000 grit to it, it is now at 500/2000 grit. That is different from 500/1000/2000 grit.


The ball is currently at 500/4000. The final surface that I want is 500/2000, so going directly to 2000 sounds like the right approach. Why would it make sense to alter the surface by hand rather than using the ball spinner? Wouldn't the ball spinner produce a more consistent finish?

Spinners have a tendency to take the surface to a slightly higher grit than when you do it by hand. Many abrasives these day shave a sponge like backing that both makes it easy for the abrasive to conform to your hand and the ball and they hold water which helps keeps down dust and lubricate the abrasive.

Almost all the time it's best to do the final abrasive or grit level by hand for "grit accuracy".
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

mduminiak

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #6 on: February 24, 2018, 06:17:30 AM
I have a ball that is currently at 4000 grit and would like to change the surface to 2000 grit. I have a ball spinner and abralon pads, and was wondering what the correct technique would be to alter the surface? Can I just use a 2000 pad, or do I need to take the surface to a much lower grit (e.g. 500) and then use a 2000 pad? Thanks.

If the ball/surface is at 500/1000/2000/4000 grit, then, yes, just taking a fresh 2000 grit to it, dampened, and by hand, you can take it to 2000 grit.

If the ball is at 500/4000 grit, then just be aware that by taking a 2000 grit to it, it is now at 500/2000 grit. That is different from 500/1000/2000 grit.


The ball is currently at 500/4000. The final surface that I want is 500/2000, so going directly to 2000 sounds like the right approach. Why would it make sense to alter the surface by hand rather than using the ball spinner? Wouldn't the ball spinner produce a more consistent finish?

Spinners have a tendency to take the surface to a slightly higher grit than when you do it by hand. Many abrasives these day shave a sponge like backing that both makes it easy for the abrasive to conform to your hand and the ball and they hold water which helps keeps down dust and lubricate the abrasive.

Almost all the time it's best to do the final abrasive or grit level by hand for "grit accuracy".

Thanks, this is really helpful. I'll just use a 2000 pad by hand to alter the surface. Is there a best practice on the technique on how to do it by hand? My initial thought is to use a wet pad and do all 6 sides (5 seconds per side) using light pressure. Thoughts?

six pack

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #7 on: February 24, 2018, 07:40:41 AM
there are so many ways to adjust cover's that there really isn't a written rule on how to do it. Just figure what works for you as far as ball reaction. I agree that a spinner will give you a higher grit finish and wonder if the underlying grit under the finial grit should be finished by hand also or maybe even more important.
E.G. 500 spinner/500/hand/2000/hand. There are so many combo's you can try,that's what makes it fun!
The harder I try the harder they fall

charlest

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #8 on: February 24, 2018, 08:52:27 AM
I have a ball that is currently at 4000 grit and would like to change the surface to 2000 grit. I have a ball spinner and abralon pads, and was wondering what the correct technique would be to alter the surface? Can I just use a 2000 pad, or do I need to take the surface to a much lower grit (e.g. 500) and then use a 2000 pad? Thanks.

If the ball/surface is at 500/1000/2000/4000 grit, then, yes, just taking a fresh 2000 grit to it, dampened, and by hand, you can take it to 2000 grit.

If the ball is at 500/4000 grit, then just be aware that by taking a 2000 grit to it, it is now at 500/2000 grit. That is different from 500/1000/2000 grit.


The ball is currently at 500/4000. The final surface that I want is 500/2000, so going directly to 2000 sounds like the right approach. Why would it make sense to alter the surface by hand rather than using the ball spinner? Wouldn't the ball spinner produce a more consistent finish?

Spinners have a tendency to take the surface to a slightly higher grit than when you do it by hand. Many abrasives these day shave a sponge like backing that both makes it easy for the abrasive to conform to your hand and the ball and they hold water which helps keeps down dust and lubricate the abrasive.

Almost all the time it's best to do the final abrasive or grit level by hand for "grit accuracy".

Thanks, this is really helpful. I'll just use a 2000 pad by hand to alter the surface. Is there a best practice on the technique on how to do it by hand? My initial thought is to use a wet pad and do all 6 sides (5 seconds per side) using light pressure. Thoughts?

6 sides may be overkill and may take it to a higher grit too easily, even with light pressure.  Try 4 sides at first and see what it gets you.

I almost always put the ball in the spinner's cup and use circular motion, with  dampened pad, pushing it from front bottom (6:00, as you look at the ball from the top/above) at the cup's edge, towards to side to about 2:00 (looking down on the top of the ball, sliding up towards the top of the ball. Then repeat. Pushing the pad towards that 2:00 position, where the ball surface meets the edge of the cup, will push the ball slightly counterclockwise, while you are rubbing it. Turn the ball over 180 degrees to do the part covered by the cup. Then rotate 90 degrees to do the "third" side; then another 90 degrees to do the "4th" side.
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mduminiak

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #9 on: February 24, 2018, 10:06:27 AM
6 sides may be overkill and may take it to a higher grit too easily, even with light pressure.  Try 4 sides at first and see what it gets you.

I almost always put the ball in the spinner's cup and use circular motion, with  dampened pad, pushing it from front bottom (6:00, as you look at the ball from the top/above) at the cup's edge, towards to side to about 2:00 (looking down on the top of the ball, sliding up towards the top of the ball. Then repeat. Pushing the pad towards that 2:00 position, where the ball surface meets the edge of the cup, will push the ball slightly counterclockwise, while you are rubbing it. Turn the ball over 180 degrees to do the part covered by the cup. Then rotate 90 degrees to do the "third" side; then another 90 degrees to do the "4th" side.

Thanks. Would about 20 seconds per side using light pressure suffice, or is there a different time or amount of pressure that works best?

charlest

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Re: Technique for going from higher to lower grit
Reply #10 on: February 24, 2018, 11:57:41 AM
6 sides may be overkill and may take it to a higher grit too easily, even with light pressure.  Try 4 sides at first and see what it gets you.

I almost always put the ball in the spinner's cup and use circular motion, with  dampened pad, pushing it from front bottom (6:00, as you look at the ball from the top/above) at the cup's edge, towards to side to about 2:00 (looking down on the top of the ball, sliding up towards the top of the ball. Then repeat. Pushing the pad towards that 2:00 position, where the ball surface meets the edge of the cup, will push the ball slightly counterclockwise, while you are rubbing it. Turn the ball over 180 degrees to do the part covered by the cup. Then rotate 90 degrees to do the "third" side; then another 90 degrees to do the "4th" side.

Thanks. Would about 20 seconds per side using light pressure suffice, or is there a different time or amount of pressure that works best?

Any figure/number I give you would only be a starting point for you/your pressure, your hand, your senses. For 4 sides, try anything from 10 - 20 seconds per and see what it gives you. Next time try 5 seconds more or 5 seconds less. There is no hard and fast rule. There can't be where the human factor enters the picture.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."