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Author Topic: Guide to Two-Handed Bowling  (Read 5799 times)

dukeblue87

  • Sr. Member
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  • Posts: 262
Guide to Two-Handed Bowling
« on: February 13, 2009, 04:56:55 AM »
DISCLAIMER:

I do not claim to be an expert on the two handed style.  These guidelines are 50% what works for me and 50% from watching videos of Jason Belmonte, Osku Palermaa, Cassidy Schaub, etc.  This is not perfect, but I believe that it is a starting guide for anyone who wants to try out two-handed bowling.

Sorry in advance for any spelling, grammar, and formatting errors.  This was made with limited time.

Thanks,
Mike

Why bowl two-handed instead of the conventional one-handed delivery?
•   Produces increased revolutions while maintaining accuracy
•   Creates a prolonged flat spot at the bottom of the swing
•   Eliminates potential “grab” at the bottom of the swing
•   Provides less stress on the wrist
•   It is way more fun to watch racks explode or rocket messengers than leaving flat 10’s =)

Should I convert to the two-handed style?  Things to consider?
•   Am I in decent physical shape?
•   Do I have at least some flexibility?
•   Am I willing to put in the quality practice that I need to improve?  League is not quality practice.
•   Do I have the resources (time, money) to put in the quality practice that I need to improve?  Again, league is not quality practice.
•   Do I have access to a video camera and someone to record me?  

Things to know beforehand
•   Two-handed bowling has A LOT of similarities to one-handed bowling.
•   Just like one handed bowling, your friends will try to help you. Just like one handed bowling, 90% of the time their advice will be wrong.
•   People will complain about how you are ruining the sport.  
•   When you are first starting, parts of your body will be sore.  Specifically your forearm and possibly your lower back.  This soreness will go away soon once you start using these muscles on a more consistent basis.
•   It is hard to say how two handed bowling will affect your body in the long run.  My personal opinion is that if you keep your body in good physical shape and stretch frequently you will not have a problem.  There is less stress on the wrist but more stress on the back and forearm.  I would say the stress on the knee is similar.
•   You should stretch before bowling.  Specifically your lower back and legs.
•   Keep an open mind and have fun learning!


Please look at these links simultaneously before continuing.
Belmonte Article
http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr179/dukeblue87/Belmonte/belmontearticle.jpg
Belmonte Frames
http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr179/dukeblue87/Belmonte/belmonteframes.jpg

A slow motion video of Belmonte
http://s481.photobucket.com/albums/rr179/dukeblue87/Belmonte/?action=view¤t=video.flv

I WILL TALK IN TERMS OF A RIGHT HANDED BOWLER WITH A 5 STEP APPROACH!!

Stance
•   Start off it a comfortable, athletic position.  
•   Knees bent slightly
•   Spine tilt about 5-10 degrees forward.
•   Hold the ball about waist high.

Grip
•   There are many different styles
o   Belmonte uses a semi fingertip grip with no thumb
o   Palermaa uses a regular fingertip grip with no thumb
o   Schaub uses a regular fingertip grip with his thumb
•   A good starting point would be trying to form a cradle with your hands and work from there.  
o   There should be some separation between your hands.
•   The weight of the ball should be split on both hands at the starting position.
•   Different positions of the left hand will cause very distinctive reactions.

Footwork
•   I have seen 4, 5, or 6 step approaches used with success.  
o   I will talk in terms of a 5 step approach because I personally feel that it is the best.
•   You can either utilize a skip step (hop) or regular steps.
o   I will cover the skip step because that is how I bowl.
•   Your first two steps are timing steps just like one handed bowling.
•   Your second step should go to the left so that you can walk around your swing.
•   Skip Steps
o   Should be on your 3rd and 4th step of 5 step approach
o   Should be very quick and cover a short distance on approach
•   Your last step (slide step) should be much longer and farther in front of your body than the last step of a one handed delivery.  
o   This is very important because it allows you to have a lot of spine tilt without face planting!
o   In order to accomplish this, you must be farther away from the foul line when going into your last step.  I know this seems very obvious on paper, but I would bet money you wouldn’t think to do it on the approach.
o   Belmonte's last step - http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr179/dukeblue87/Belmonte/JasonSide.jpg
•   Most two handed bowlers have a decent slide.  I’ve only seen one plant their slide foot.
•   Just like one handed bowling, footwork and timing go together.

Spine Tilt
•   The ideal spine tilt (bending over at the waist) is about 75- 80 degrees.
o   Belmonte's spine tilt - http://i481.photobucket.com/albums/rr179/dukeblue87/Belmonte/JasonFront.jpg
•   The Spine tilt helps to project the ball “through” the lane with rotation, rather than “on” the lane with lift.
o   In other words, the spin tilt helps the ball get down the lane and hook on the backend, instead of the ball hooking early and stopping on the backend.
•   You can get away with having little spine tilt on a THS.  Once you bowl on a few sport patterns with no hold in the middle you will soon see how important spine tilt is.
•   From footwork section: Your last step should be much longer and farther in front of your body than the last step of a one handed delivery.  This is very important because it allows you to have a lot of spine tilt without face planting!
o    In order to accomplish this, you must be farther away from the foul line when going into your last step.  I know this seems very obvious on paper, but I would bet money you wouldn’t think to do it on the approach.


Swing
•   Your push away should start as you are beginning your 2nd step.  
•   The push away should forward, lightly inwards, and slightly upwards.  
o   Forward and upwards to help generate speed.  
o   Inwards to keep the swing close to the body.
•   Your hand should rotate slightly towards the inside of the ball on the push away.  
o   This helps create leverage at the release.
•   The swing should stay as tight to the body as possible to keep your leverage.
•   Your shoulders will have to open on the backswing and close at the release.
•   Your elbow should be bent at the top of the backswing to increase the height of the swing.
•   Your elbow should then uncork right before the release to add speed and revolutions.
•   The bowling arm should stay on the inside part of the ball until release.  
o   In other words keep the arm close to the ankle to prevent “chicken winging.”
•   The left hand stays on the ball until just before the release point.  The left hand is not used to add revolutions to the bowling ball.  This is a common misconception.
o   The purpose of the left hand is to add stability throughout the swing.  Your left hand is your “thumb.”


Release
•   The left hand stays on the ball until just before the release point.  The left hand is not used to add revolutions to the bowling ball.  This is a common misconception.
•   The ball should be next to your ankle at release to create leverage.
•   If your track is inverted (you are most likely tracking over the middle finger) then you are releasing the ball way too late.  
•   Do not try to add revolutions to the bowling ball.  
o   They will come naturally with the two-handed style.

Timing
•   Your timing needs to be late to help project the ball to the right.
•   Your slide should be finishing/finished by the time you release the ball.

Spares
•   Some two-handed bowlers use two hands for spare and some use one hand.
•   One hand at spares
o   Pro - Easier to throw the ball straighter
o   Con - Usually different timing than your 2 handed delivery.  Can be hard to switch back and forth.
•   Two hands at spares
o   Pro - Same timing as strike shot.
o   Con - Harder to throw the ball as straight.
•   Either way, buy yourself a plastic ball PLEASE!

Drillings and ball choices
•   Forewarning: most of this section is basic ball reaction knowledge.  It is the same as a high rev, high track player that bowls with one hand! Pin positions will vary depending on your PAP.  I’m going to assume you will have a higher track as most other two handers do.
•   Layouts that seems to work best for me.  Results may/will very for you.
o   Pin over bridge, cg in palm.  Good for playing deeper inside as it gives good length through the heads and a strong back end.
o   Pin right of right, cg in palm (label drilling).  Good when playing farther outside.  Gives decent length with a controllable arc.
•   Most two handed bowlers that I have seen track fairly high.  Therefore, a lot of pin under drillings track over the middle finger if you’re not careful!
•   Ball choices
o   Medium to high RG cores are usually best.
o   Solid covers are the most versatile.  They blend out the pattern.
o   Pearl covers tend to jerk of friction too hard creating over/under on many conditions.
•   Drilling for the thumbless bowler
o   USBC - You have to be able to demonstrate that you are able to reasonably grip the ball by all finger and thumbs holes.  You are not required to use any/all of the holes.
o   PBA - you must cover the thumb hole with your palm or else it is considered a weight hole.
o   Drill the ball so that it sits comfortably in your hand.  Your ring finger will most likely need to be dropped about 1/8th inch, or your thumb will need to be moved approx 1 inch to the right.  This is so you can center the thumb hole on your palm to make sure you are holding the ball the same on every shot.

FAQ’s

Q:  My rev rate overpowers my ball speed.  How do I throw it harder?

A:  First, make sure your elbow is fairly straight at the release.  Second, your 3rd and 4th steps should be pretty short and quick.  Your last step needs to be very long.  This will help create later timing as well.  Third, spine tilt helps get the ball through the heads and midlane.  Fourth, the more comfortable you become with the style, the fast you will be able to throw the ball.  DO NOT try to muscle the ball down the lane.  

Q:  My accuracy sucks.  I spray the ball all over the lane.

A:  Try to develop consistent timing.  Just like one-handed bowling, accuracy is directly related to timing.  Get the ball into the swing at the same time every shot.  Have consistent footwork.

Q:  My balance sucks.

A:  Again, balance is related to consistent timing.  First, your last step needs to be long.  Second, your timing needs to be late.  Try to get your 3rd and 4th steps to be fast and short.


Here is a link to some more pictures of Belmonte.
http://s481.photobucket.com/albums/rr179/dukeblue87/Belmonte/
There are many videos of Jason Belmonte, Osku Palermaa, and Cassidy Schaub on youtube.

Hopefully this will give you an idea of where to start.  I would love to hear feedback on what works and what doesn’t work.  However, please back your feedback up with reasons why or why not.  This guide is not perfect, so consider it a work in progress.

Mike

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Two Hands are better than one!!