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Author Topic: The Crow (Read 3002 times)

BallReviews-scodaddy21

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The Crow
on: July 28, 2016, 10:58:09 AM
Ball NPS Score: Not Available
Everyone says urethanes are a thing of the past....outdated....don't carry well enough.  Well now it's time to pull this one out of the bag and make your competition eat CROW!
The Crow utilizes the same great core found in the Raven line, and surrounds it with a strong yet very smooth, controllable urethane coverstock.  Don't be fooled, this one still packs a punch and can be used on a wide variety of lane conditions.

Color: Black
Core: Ogre HDC Core
Coverstock: HPU Throwback (urethane)
Factory Finish: 500 Abralon
RG: 16 - 2.55" 15 - 2.56" 14 - 2.58"
Differential: 16 - .046" 15 - .044" 14 - .048"
Lane Conditions: Medium

Matt C

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Re: The Crow
Reply #1 on: September 05, 2016, 04:20:20 PM
LANE CONDITION

Length:

Volume:

Type (THS, Sport Pattern etc):


COMMENTS

Likes:

Dislikes:


PICTURES AND/OR VIDEOS

tomf

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Re: The Crow
Reply #2 on: September 13, 2016, 02:11:53 PM
LANE CONDITION

Length: 41'

Volume: 22.5 ml

Type (THS, Sport Pattern etc): THS with VERY clean back ends.


COMMENTS

Likes: Very predictable.  Keeps the ball in play and still rolls well and hits hard.

Dislikes: Not really a dislike, but simply something to keep in mind.  As it is a non-reactive urethane there is a limit as to how much entry angle you can create.  It's best to keep the line more direct.  Fortunately, being non-reactive you can add a little speed as the lanes dry out, keep playing the same line, and not worry about it checking up too soon and jumping.

I've used this ball in two different houses so far.  One house for two league sessions and another house for a practice session.  I have to say that I'm extremely impressed.  I'm still learning what the ball will and won't do, and the two league sessions have still come out to a 238.5 average, with one game in the 200's, one in the 220's, two in the 240's, and two in the 250's.  Very predictable and even-rolling, as one would expect from a non-reactive urethane.  What I didn't expect was how hard it would hit.  Having a "real" core (symmetrical with a differential of 0.044) makes such a difference over other non-reactives.  I had one shot in my last league session where I leaked it a bit wide.  It hit the dry and recovered, but obviously not as hard as a reactive.  I could see that it would make it back to the pocket, but expected to leave a weak 7 (I'm left handed).  Instead I had a momentary "blower 7-10" until two messengers came flying from opposite sides, crisscrossed each other on diagonal paths, and took out both corner pins!  To put it bluntly, this ain't your daddy's non-reactive.  But it is still a non-reactive, so there are a few things to keep in mind.  First of all, there is a limit as to how much entry angle you can create.  Most of us would not be able to stand against the ball return and bank it off the gutter.  A small swing is OK, but keeping it more direct is probably best.  Second, as the lanes dry out you can keep playing the same line with a little more speed.  With reactives, most of the time you can't do this.  When they hit dry, they check up and jump no matter how hard you throw it.  With this ball, a little more speed will give you some "push".  Third, remember to bring a towel.  Yep, you'll have to wipe the oil off this one off between frames.  This is a ball that everyone could find a use for, but a few situations stand out in my mind.  First, EVERY left hander should have one.  As we normally play closer to the outside anyway, this ball will still roll and hit without having to worry about it knifing through the headpin.  While not a reactive, it will still generate more than enough angle to get the job done from the outside.  Especially if you can play up the boards or maybe 10-5.  Second, bowlers on flatter conditions can see several advantages.  On the fresh you can play more direct without having the ball go crazy on clean back ends.  As the shot starts to break down, you can still play in the track area without moving deep and worrying about the ball skipping past the dry and into the out of bounds.  And because it doesn't overreact, you can keep it in play and avoid the "alternating big four/washout" strings.  Another place I can see this ball working is for those who have a high axis rotation but low tilt.  Many times these players are stuck in "over/under" hell.  The ball rolls too soon in the dry but won't recover enough if sent too much away from the pocket.  This ball won't force them too deep, and let them use their heavier roll without overreacting in the dry.  Lastly, I see this as a great ball for those with slower ball speeds or who are rev dominant.  Many times these players struggle with reactives.  Strong reactives grab too soon and die for slow speeds or are uncontrollable for the rev dominant.  Weak reactives are an option, but either won't hit because of a weak core or completely skate and fizzle in the oil because of a weak (and usually polished) shell.  This ball would allow them to have the control to find the pocket and the hit to carry.  There are times when having a good reactive ball is necessary to compete, especially if you have the speed, rev rate, rotation, and tilt to utilize their potential.  This is the ball for those other times and the rest of us.

PICTURES AND/OR VIDEOS

nord

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Re: The Crow
Reply #3 on: December 23, 2016, 07:41:25 PM
Great review! Thank you.
This part of your review seems to apply to me as I am a low ball speed, zero tilt, full roller with a 90 degree axis rotation:
Quote
Another place I can see this ball working is for those who have a high axis rotation but low tilt.  Many times these players are stuck in "over/under" hell.  The ball rolls too soon in the dry but won't recover enough if sent too much away from the pocket.  This ball won't force them too deep, and let them use their heavier roll without overreacting in the dry.  Lastly, I see this as a great ball for those with slower ball speeds or who are rev dominant.
How would you say The Crow compares to the Karma Urethane?

bowling_rebel

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Re: The Crow
Reply #4 on: March 17, 2017, 02:52:14 PM
The crow is a pretty unique ball. It's a strong urethane compared to what other companies are doing - putting weak, or high diff cores in urethane.

Compared to my other urethane, Storms Supernatural, it's abut 2 to 4 boards stronger. The crow, being a strong, solid urethane will grab the lanes early if the heads are dried up. So for conditions where the heads are toast it's not the best ball. A pearl urethane or reactive than can move deeper inside with are probably better.

This isn't to say crow can't be good on dry lanes, just not for super dry or it'll check early. More for median or light oil. Easy to control and hits very hard. Anyway, it's unlikely that would find conditions like that in league, but in longer tournaments it can happen.

Compared to Supernatural I think it hits harder. More likely to see messengers with it. Regardless, a well thrown modern urethane ball will hit as hard as a reactive. I think where see the difference is if you don't thrown a well. Like if you don't release a reactive well, maybe you get to pocket and leave a 10 pin, but with urethane that can turn into a 5-7 split.

I like the ball, but it's condition specific. It'll give you a very different option for medium to light oil if you just don't have a good shot with reactive. Also may be an option on some sport conditions  because it's controllable.

With some other urethane's on market - it almost seems like they are designed for only high rev players, the crow will hit very hard even if rev rate is in the low 200's, as long as it's thrown well. Even though my rev rate is about 230 - when I practice on dry lanes after league, no problem seeing it hit hard playing between 2cd and 3rd arrow. Compared to the Supernatural (and I imagine other pearl or weaker urethane's would be similar) I can only play as far in as 2cd arrow or else I get splits, and weak 5 pins. Although sometimes the Supernatural will have a good shot around 1st arrow, but if I try to use the Crow on those lines it'll check very early and go high or cross over.

So if you want a strong urethane, and different option on median to light lane conditions it's great to have.

However, it's not a benchmark ball, not for heavy oil, and if looking from something for the most dry conditions then a pearl urethane is probably better.

I also have an older Ogre Urethane which I rarely use. With that ball, if lanes are super dry it would check to early and the Supernatural was far better. However, if I moved inside with Ogre urethane, it's would just hit weak. I like the Crow much more.

Last point - many people use urethane as light oil/ spare ball. Unless you are fairly good at killing your hook, I wouldn't recommend using Crow as a spare ball.

nord

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Re: The Crow
Reply #5 on: April 17, 2017, 04:47:36 PM
Excellent review and information. Big thanks.

I have a Crow and have found it to be a wicked strong ball that I must keep inside second arrow on house shots or it will die out.

I am a Full Roller with low revs (150rpm), 90 degree axis rotation and zero tilt with slow ball speed, 12mph off my hand.

With The Crow I stand with right foot on 17 or 18 and roll up 12 or 13 out to 10 and back. As the Crow gets saturated with oil and starts to lube up, I can then move right with my feet to square it up and keep the reaction going.

But this is a real strong ball that will check up very early if you get it into the dry!

I have bowled on a house shot where my Hammer Dark Legend solid at 1000 grit was just skidding up second arrow and not reacting, but when I pulled out the Crow, on the same target line, it was going Brooklyn!

Additional Information:
I made a video of me rolling The Crow on a heavy house shot. Even with my modest game, you can see how heavy a roll this ball gets and how hard it can hit.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIEDkKpwmBo
Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 03:12:17 AM by nord

HackJandy

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Re: The Crow
Reply #6 on: July 07, 2017, 01:43:20 PM
LANE CONDITION

Length:

Volume:

Type (THS, Sport Pattern etc):  THS

COMMENTS

Likes:

Ball is nearly as strong as my Burgundy Hammer (new version) on THS.  Had it drilled pin down and is the smoothest rolling piece I have ever thrown.  Very very consistent ball action both all the way down the lane and during the whole series.  A very good ball to have for bowling on house shots and not having to move much or change target (15 to 10 for days).  Have only rolled a handful of games with it but for whatever reason I seem to be able to lay it down where I want better than any of my non spare balls.  Also enjoy the throw back look.

Dislikes:

Its still real urethane and the carry is very good for a urethane but still less than my Burgundy Hammer (for example much more likely to get a Brooklyn strike with the Burgundy).  If you don't have a lot of hand accuracy will be at a premium to strike consistency with The Crow.  The ball leaves 5 pins for days if you hit light.  It seems to be very forgiving though if you go high. Ball seems to prefer to be played more direct down and in and slightly high.  It's strong enough probably to pull off more of a swing shot but my guess is carry will really suffer especially for us strokers.

(edit:  After several weeks of use the more I use this ball the more my other balls sit.  If you want a go to urethane that can handle virtually any THS even if you are reved challenged this is your ball.) 

PICTURES AND/OR VIDEOS
Last Edit: July 21, 2017, 01:43:48 PM by HackJandy
Faball Burgundy, Blue, Black Hammers
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Visionary The Crow
Visionary Ogre Urethane
C300 EPX T1 and some boring reactives