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Author Topic: USBC Blue  (Read 4077 times)

no300tj

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USBC Blue
« on: July 14, 2015, 09:44:04 PM »
Ok, I am going to bowl a tournament on the blue pattern. Looking at the patterns, it can be 19+ ml volume or 27 + depending on which blue it is. 3.2 or 4.2 to 1 for the ratios. I have bowled on the PBAX as well as the city patterns, and am looking for any advice as far as surface goes. 27+ would allow me to throw balls that hook in oil (Destroyr, Maxx Zone, Terminator), but 19 changes to lighter pattern equipment (Big R Bang, Freeze Hybrid, Slingshot).
With the stronger balls, is surface the ticket or do I want to let the nature of the ball do it? Lighter, is a slingshot with surface it or try to create more roll? What have you had success with?

 

spmcgivern

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2015, 07:41:57 AM »
The range of patterns are usually used to simulate a consistent shot across different lane bed types.  The heavier versions of Blue are used on wood lanes or older high friction synthetics where as the lighter versions are used on newer low friction synthetics. 

It would be impossible to duplicate the reaction on different surfaces, but this is USBC's attempt at trying to make it as similar as they can.

kidlost2000

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2015, 09:13:57 AM »
Bowled on this pattern twice in the same house. Synthetics not sure what.

For me getting in and hooking the ball was wide open. Used an Aura with 500/2000 surface but there were plenty of other options that would be just fine. Was looking at 25 to 10 anything outside of 10 was out of bounds. If you like playing outside the shot is there but very unforgiving. Moving in there is a lot more friction down lane and made for a much easier time.

Start off playing your normal line and then move right and left of there and see what you like.
you can't  add a physics term to a bowling term and expect it to mean something.

Brandon Riley

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2015, 06:27:07 PM »
I've bowled on a few blue patterns and there is quite a variance in length.  The longer (I think it was Blue 1) scores well from in as Kid experienced, but in my experience the shorter Blue patterns can be pretty nasty depending on the surface.
Brandon Riley
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no300tj

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2015, 08:01:24 PM »
Sounds like an inside line is a good place to start. I was wondering if playing out would force you to thread a needle. Thanks for the advice gentlemen.

Dave81644

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2015, 09:30:04 PM »
use the -31 rule to start

Pattern length tells you where to play
Pattern volume tells you how strong of a ball to use

kidlost2000

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2015, 09:50:24 PM »
Use the ball reaction rule
you can't  add a physics term to a bowling term and expect it to mean something.

no300tj

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2015, 10:12:34 PM »
The -31 rule will help if I can get someone to tell me the length. Otherwise, I'm left to what I see.

spmcgivern

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2015, 07:53:15 AM »
Trust your eyes.  For me, most sport shots (or almost sport shots) applied by centers who 99% of the time run house shots don't necessarily play as difficult compared to a weekend long tournament that runs the shot multiple times in a row.

Using length may tell you how to approach the shot, but don't ignore the center's normal track area.  Try a variety of lines and let your eyes tell you what to do.

Dave81644

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Re: USBC Blue
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2015, 11:18:26 AM »
Trust your eyes.  For me, most sport shots (or almost sport shots) applied by centers who 99% of the time run house shots don't necessarily play as difficult compared to a weekend long tournament that runs the shot multiple times in a row.

Using length may tell you how to approach the shot, but don't ignore the center's normal track area.  Try a variety of lines and let your eyes tell you what to do.

+1 - great advice for sure
I usually try to get on the 1st squad for multiple shifts tourney as I'm hoping the house memory will help and usually the 1st shift squads have higher scores from what i have seen