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Author Topic: Comment on previous advice given  (Read 2630 times)

Newbs

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Comment on previous advice given
« on: May 08, 2003, 03:26:48 PM »
I've stated many times that since I started bowling this past January, that a 15# ball might be too heavy for me. Many of you stated that the more I bowl, the stronger my wrist, fingers, and forearm would get. Well, I started out as a slow roller with little revs. The last couple of times out, I've found more ease in revving up, my backswing is coming back further. Another thing I've found is the importance of keeping my hand and finger holes bone dry. I even have felt the tendency at the top of my backswing to turn the wrist inward, then coming back straight, like I've seen some crankers do. It felt totally natural though. Is this something I should harness, or should I go with my instincts?


 

10 In The Pit

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Re: Comment on previous advice given
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2003, 11:13:37 PM »
I wouldn't recommend that you go overboard on turning the wrist inward.  By turning the wrist in the backswing (which I sometimes do myself), you can lose a little bit of control over the ball.  Also, it might set you up to come off the side of the ball with a topping motion, which is not a preferred release.  I wouldn't worry about a slight turning inward of the wrist in the backswing, but I wouldn't let it go overboard either.  It could prove to be a habit that you might have to break later.

Newbs

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Re: Comment on previous advice given
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2003, 08:47:33 AM »
I'm thinking the turning of the wrist subconsciously enables me to "hold" the backswing at the pinnacle. Maybe that's why I do it.

Michael DeSantis

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Re: Comment on previous advice given
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2003, 02:52:32 PM »
Some bowlers do almost a figure 8 between their backswing and their release. Pete Weber has a somewhat unorthodoxed motion, for example.  The key is to have the ball in the best position and location for a smooth and leveraged release.  When you have the proper timing and the proper release point, you can actually feel the ball come off your hand and see the balls reaction on the lane as it reads the lane and hits the pocket with full force.  I actually get to experience that once in a while.
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charlest

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Re: Comment on previous advice given
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2003, 04:05:55 PM »
quote:
newbs:
I even have felt the tendency at the top of my backswing to turn the wrist inward, then coming back straight, like I've seen some crankers do. It felt totally natural though. Is this something I should harness, or should I go with my instincts?



1. Humans, as far as I know, have no bowling instincts; I wish we/I did.

If you're turning your wrist inwards, your body is trying to make up for some other factor in your timing, that is not in sync with the rest of your body. I would strongly recommend that, if you are at the beginning of your bowling career,  you try NOT to imitate any crankers, unless it is  very important to your macho image of yourself to throw a huge hook. In the long run, a stroker/tweener will outscore a cranker and do it with much more ease and on a variety of conditions.

The KIS principle is never more important than in bowling: Keep It Simple. Some people take this saying a step further in intensity by add an extra "S":
KISS - Keep It Simple, Stupid!

(I believe
The simpler your delivery (release and approach), the easier it is to repeat. Proper repetition is THE key to successful bowling.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."