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Author Topic: Does heating remove polish?  (Read 3096 times)

Bowldozer

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Does heating remove polish?
« on: April 18, 2019, 06:12:26 AM »
Hi there,
I had just had my old NVS repolished 3 weeks ago and was wondering if I were to remove the oil by heating it as usual, would it remove the polish layer too?
How long will I have to wait?
Will the polish layer clog the pores and keep the oil from entering / removing out of the ball?
Whatís the differences between power house / crown polish?
Sorry for these stupid questions but Iím eager to learn.
Thanks.
The Magician 🎩 of carries
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Friendís Bowling Academy - Paris

 

imagonman

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #1 on: April 18, 2019, 09:50:14 AM »
OK this is a BIG misnomer in surface prep. Polish is NOT a coating applied like a wax/slip agent/silicon. It is a process just like sanding it rough { I.E. - an 80 grit paper used}. One would not say 'I have sand on my ball'. Polishing, the process, is just extremely fine abrasive suspended in a paste to refine surfaces to super-smooth texture, or lack thereof. Think more along the lines of a glass mirror. The surface is as smooth as 'glass' there is no 'polish' on it. NOW take a sander w/40 grit on it & go to work. No longer reflective or considered a mirror. The glass surface is highly scratched & rough. There is NO sand on it's surface its just the end result of the process used to roughen the surface. Conversely with polishing that glass surface to return it to a mirror.
 Any heat applied [below the melting point} would not alter the surface roughness/smoothness. Think peaks & valleys, they start getting more 'clogged', another misnomer, with each successive higher grit applied until you get to the point of eliminating the peaks/valleys altogether.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2019, 10:11:47 AM by imagonman »

BowlingForDonuts

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #2 on: April 18, 2019, 11:37:39 AM »
OK this is a BIG misnomer in surface prep. Polish is NOT a coating applied like a wax/slip agent/silicon. It is a process just like sanding it rough { I.E. - an 80 grit paper used}. One would not say 'I have sand on my ball'. Polishing, the process, is just extremely fine abrasive suspended in a paste to refine surfaces to super-smooth texture, or lack thereof. Think more along the lines of a glass mirror. The surface is as smooth as 'glass' there is no 'polish' on it. NOW take a sander w/40 grit on it & go to work. No longer reflective or considered a mirror. The glass surface is highly scratched & rough. There is NO sand on it's surface its just the end result of the process used to roughen the surface. Conversely with polishing that glass surface to return it to a mirror.
 Any heat applied [below the melting point} would not alter the surface roughness/smoothness. Think peaks & valleys, they start getting more 'clogged', another misnomer, with each successive higher grit applied until you get to the point of eliminating the peaks/valleys altogether.

^this.  TL;DR if baking the ball yourself and don't have a spinner then don't worry about the surface as baking will still remove oil (and not affect surface).  Even more oil comes out when take ball surface down before baking but without a spinner or another trip to PSO to bring it back up then wouldn't worry about it.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2019, 12:14:58 PM by BowlingForDonuts »
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Bowldozer

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2019, 04:05:45 AM »
Thanks Guys for the input. So, the abrasive particles are suspended in the paste.
But, the paste itself added the glossy effect on the ball? It seems that on top of the ball surface thereís a fine layer of polish on it.
The Magician 🎩 of carries
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dizzyfugu

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2019, 04:39:12 AM »
No, the paste is the medium that carries the abrasive material, just like sand paper or pads. Bowling ball polish is not like car or furniture polish, which normally contains wax and/or silicone that actually fills small scratches and adds a layer that creates the glossy finish - NOT recommended on a reactive ball since you more or less ruin the material's properties, literally clogging the tiny pores that create the friction on the lane. Car polish works well on polyester balls, though!

While the effect is a shiny surface, "polish" is a somewhat misleading description for bowling ball polishes, because it is a fluid that allows you to sand a surface at a very high grit level. The effect visually resembles the glossy finish of a wax-based product, but leaves the surface material "uncovered".

This is also the reason why heat or oil extraction will not affect the surface finish.
DizzyFugu ~ Reporting from Germany

strikeking12

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2019, 03:07:53 PM »
I do not use "polish" anymore, I found that swirl remover works better and last a lot longer. No more wax for me.

MI 2 AZ

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2019, 06:39:19 PM »
No more wax for me.

Did you read the posts by Imagonman or Dizzyfugu? 

Their whole point is that bowling ball polish is not wax but very fine abrasives so the ball surface does not have any type of 'coating' afterwards, just a very high grit number.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 06:56:36 PM by MI 2 AZ »
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MI 2 AZ

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2019, 06:52:08 PM »
I do not use "polish" anymore, I found that swirl remover works better and last a lot longer. No more wax for me.

I looked up Swirl Remover as I was unfamiliar with that product and it is a car refinishing cleaner/polish.  Warnings on product state: 

Vapors may be harmful.  May irritate the nose and throat and cause dizziness, headache or nausea.

Avoid eye and skin contact.  Avoid breathing of vapors.  Use only with adequate ventilation.  Wash thoroughly after handling. 



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BowlingForDonuts

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2019, 06:59:05 PM »
If he wants to ruin his equipment with car wax as well as potentially disqualify himself in any sanctioned competition its his thing.  As Dizzy says car polish is only good for making polyester go dead straight but its also not legal in competition.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 07:06:20 PM by BowlingForDonuts »
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MI 2 AZ

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2019, 08:01:24 PM »
If he wants to ruin his equipment with car wax as well as potentially disqualify himself in any sanctioned competition its his thing.  As Dizzy says car polish is only good for making polyester go dead straight but its also not legal in competition.

What he is using doesn't seem to be a wax polish, but much like a bowling ball polish, fine grit in a liquid.  My point is that it seems to be more hazardous than just a ball polish.  At least the ones I used to use. 

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imagonman

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2019, 12:35:57 AM »
If you're referring to Swirl Remover 2.0 by Meguiars I've used that & it does a good job, leaves no residue. Years ago used 3M Finesse-it, basically the same thing w/ the same warnings on MSDS. Neither leave any residue, coating, wax 'polish'. Now there are a few Meguiars finishing products that have silicon in them which WILL leave a residue as you know very slippery. Much like Storm polishes w/ slip agents.

Using a generic 'car wax' is not the polishing action we are seeking in regards to manipulating the surface texture of the ball.

dizzyfugu

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2019, 07:08:19 AM »
If he wants to ruin his equipment with car wax as well as potentially disqualify himself in any sanctioned competition its his thing.  As Dizzy says car polish is only good for making polyester go dead straight but its also not legal in competition.

What he is using doesn't seem to be a wax polish, but much like a bowling ball polish, fine grit in a liquid.  My point is that it seems to be more hazardous than just a ball polish.  At least the ones I used to use. 



The old Lanemasters polish is also a gritless stuff (or it is so fine that it is unidentifiable by vision or touch), it's almost like an oil. No idea what it contains, but it leaves the ball shiny - and still tacky. No idea how this finish responds to heat treatments, though.
DizzyFugu ~ Reporting from Germany

Bowldozer

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Re: Does heating remove polish?
« Reply #12 on: May 06, 2019, 03:54:00 AM »
No, the paste is the medium that carries the abrasive material, just like sand paper or pads. Bowling ball polish is not like car or furniture polish, which normally contains wax and/or silicone that actually fills small scratches and adds a layer that creates the glossy finish - NOT recommended on a reactive ball since you more or less ruin the material's properties, literally clogging the tiny pores that create the friction on the lane. Car polish works well on polyester balls, though!

While the effect is a shiny surface, "polish" is a somewhat misleading description for bowling ball polishes, because it is a fluid that allows you to sand a surface at a very high grit level. The effect visually resembles the glossy finish of a wax-based product, but leaves the surface material "uncovered".

This is also the reason why heat or oil extraction will not affect the surface finish.

Thanks very much Dizzyfugu. Iím reporting from France 🇫🇷 . This forumís very helpful for beginners.
Cheers.
The Magician 🎩 of carries
Proud to be member of
Friendís Bowling Academy - Paris