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Author Topic: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze  (Read 2654 times)

scotts33

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Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« on: October 27, 2004, 05:54:19 AM »
Looking for info. on resurfacing to box condition.  Did a search and came up with nothing.  Sorry, I know it's been asked before.

Coverstock: XLP (Extra Length Proactive) MTX-2
Color: Navy Sparkle
Hardness: 78-80
Factory Finish: Cerium-Oxide Trizact <-------what is the grit I should be purchasing????  Take it down to a low grit and then work up????  I assume trizact wet/dry sand paper....yes?

Thanks for the help,
Scott


Scott

 

mrbowlingnut

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2004, 02:06:20 PM »
cerium oxide trizact is its own pad they are white and fit cabs, i think they around 1200 but i have not seen the grit in a long time. I still have these pads from about 4 years ago they work but it never seemed to be exact even using trizact pads only in resurfacing. The reaction was close but never factory surface porbably because i could not do it exact twice on a spinner.

charlest

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2004, 03:15:16 PM »
Good try, mrbowlingnut, but the cerium oxide has to be at least 2500 grit, maybe even higher. It actually put almost a gloss polish on my Riot Zone.

Scott, if you can't get any cerium oxide pads and the others, send me a private message.

Sorry, folks, but I still have to  STILL believe that the Trizact pads are THE right way to polish and/or re-surface the older Brunswick particle balls. I have tried sandpaper and polishes on the old ones and then Trizact. It makes all the difference in the world. Maybe their new particles are made of something else, that they can be affected by plain sandpaper. The older ones like the Riot Zone and this Fuze? Nope.
 
--------------------
"When we choose an action,
we also choose the consequences of that action.


Edited on 10/27/2004 3:18 PM
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

Ragnar

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2004, 03:31:16 PM »
Charlest, trizact pads come in a number of varying grades.  How this relates to what we think of as sanding grits I'm not sure - but I assume the FEPA equivalents would be it?

3M Trizact Abrasive grades

(Average mineral size in microns)             FEPA P-grade equivalents
                                 
6                                             P2500  
   
16                                            P1200
   
20
   
30
   
40
   
45                                            P400
   
60
   
65                                            P280
   
80
   
90                                            P220
   
100
   
110                                           P180
   
160                                           P120
   
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charlest

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2004, 04:22:00 PM »
Rags,

You should know by now that I do my homework!

Rags, and Swishing8-10,

When I purchased my original Trizact pads and its CAB (different from sandpaper CAB)from Innovative Bowling, I got a chart from them indicating the approximate ranges of the green, blue, orange and white pads.

Here at ballreviews we have had many discussions over the past 2-3 years over why to use them, how to use them and how some people still believed in using plain sandpaper (no comment). Here is teh chart I got from Innovative:

Trizact Orange pad (A5 micron or 1000-2500 grit {roughly 1200 grit})
Trizact Blue pad (A10 micron or 500-1000 grit {roughly 600 grit})
Trizact Green pad (A35 micron or 180-600 grit {roughly 320 grit})

Brunswick personnel have also posted here their interpretations of the actual grits of the Trizact pads since they worked closely with 3M, the actual inventors & manufacturers of Trizact. However, I checked into the 3M details on their websites and I emailed 3M directly for some more bits of information. Here is the assembled these bits of info:


An email reply to a question to 3M regarding Trizact, micron and Scotch-Brite:

To extrapolate the micron to grit conversion from 3M:
35 micron ~ 360 grit,
10 micron ~ 1100 grit
5 micron  ~ 1600 grit.
-----------------------------------------------

Trizact and micron(u) grading are two separate things. Trizact products
are graded on their own scale ranging from A6 - A160.

3M Superabrasives are micron graded, that is, measuring the average size
of an individual particle on that product.

Standard abrasive grading is based on the screen mesh used to separate
out the particles for a particle grade. In simplest terms, in a 1"
line of grade 24 product there are ~24 particles. In a 1" line of
grade 600 product there are ~600 particles.

In comparison, 9u=1200 grit, 15u=600, 20u=500, 30u=400, 40u=320

The European grading system (designated by the letter P (example: P600).
This is similar to the standard grading system until you
get into grades finer than 220, then it becomes staggered the finer you
go.

Scotchbrite goes as follows:

7445 is a light duty cleaning pad
7448 is a ultra fine pad, ~1000 grit(S)
7447 is a very fine pad,  ~320 grit (A)
7446 is a medium pad,     ~150 grit (S)

A= Alum Oxide
S= Silicon Carbide

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Another email reply from 3M.\:

If we extrapolate the European standard
for abrasives as provided by 3M, the following are the results:

A5  = P3000 = approx, 1500 grit = 3 micron
A10 = P1500 = approx.  750 grit = 12 micron
A35 = P600  = approx.  380 grit = 26 micron

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Trizact is a 3M invented product and is not micron graded. 3M developed
Trizact products in and graded them between A5-A160.

A5 = P3000, A10 = P1500, A35 = P600

Cerium Oxide has no grade, it is used for polishing. It is finer than
P3000, maybe in the 5000-8000 range.

--------------------
"When we choose an action,
we also choose the consequences of that action.


Edited on 10/27/2004 4:25 PM
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

charlest

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2004, 08:34:19 PM »
Swishing8-10,

No, it is not impossible. Brunswick specifies the finish for all their balls. Scott said that the finish for his Fuze was the cerium Oxide pad. So, you can certainly use the other Trizact pads to re-surface it, but the final one will be with a Cerium Oxide pad. That will bring it back to stock finish.

I have changed several Brunswick particle balls, up and down the scale, just like one would use sandpaper or nylon pads on plain resin balls.
--------------------
"When we choose an action,
we also choose the consequences of that action.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

scotts33

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2004, 06:36:50 AM »
charlest--Thanks for the info.  I knew you and others had discussed this the last few years.  Especially when the Fuze's & Riot Zone came out in 2001 or so.  Dang 30 days search function sucks!

I'll check with Innovative for the right pads.  Should I purchase all three orange, blue & green?

Another question.  Pro shop friend has a Haus machine and I asked him how he resurfaced Fuze's.  He said with diamond wheel.  What grit is diamond wheel?  Anybody done this before and how did the ball come out?  

Thanks again,
Scott
Scott

charlest

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2004, 09:07:06 AM »
quote:

I'll check with Innovative for the right pads.  Should I purchase all three orange, blue & green?


If you want or need to do a total re-surface, because the track has deep gouges, yes.

quote:

Another question.  Pro shop friend has a Haus machine and I asked him how he resurfaced Fuze's.  He said with diamond wheel.  What grit is diamond wheel?  Anybody done this before and how did the ball come out?  


I can't answer that. I'd assume they have grits just like any other type of "sand"paper. Being diamonds, I must assume it will be able to affect the Brunswick particles. HOWEVER, I would not use it as the final surface prep. I would use the cerium oxide Trizact pad.

--------------------
"When we choose an action,
we also choose the consequences of that action.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

scotts33

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Re: Resurface Sparkle Navy Fuze
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2004, 09:14:35 AM »
Thanks Jeff...your knowledge is much appreciated.  

Scott
Scott