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Author Topic: Ball Spinner 101  (Read 3821 times)

Bruce

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Ball Spinner 101
« on: June 09, 2003, 12:54:35 AM »
I will be getting my first spinner in a few days.  It is going to be the Vertex 1/2 hp model.  I have never used one before so I was wondering if anyone was willing to guide me in my journey.  You know...give me a ball spinner 101 class on the proper ways to sand and polish.  I know it is a lot of information so anything to get me started in the proper direction would be great.

TIA,

Bruce

 

MI 2 AZ

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Re: Ball Spinner 101
« Reply #1 on: June 09, 2003, 04:40:32 PM »
Note I am not endorsing any of these products.

Here is a link for a spinner video:

http://www.innovativebowling.com/video.htm


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Here is a link to tips on using a spinner:

http://www.donkee.com/polishing.htm

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I think there was another website with tips but I cant find it right now.
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Six decades of league bowling and still learning.

ABC/USBC Lifetime Member since Aug 1995.

MI 2 AZ

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_________________________________________
Six decades of league bowling and still learning.

ABC/USBC Lifetime Member since Aug 1995.

Bruce

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Re: Ball Spinner 101
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2003, 10:11:01 AM »
Thanks for the info guys.  

I already have an old Triton Elite that is going to be my test subject.  I do have a few other questions.

Should I use sandpaper or scotchbrite pads?

Which polishes should I use?  I know there is not one specific one, but which ones do you recommend?

Which other products should I try?

Bruce

Typhoon

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Re: Ball Spinner 101
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2003, 11:11:56 AM »
I use both Scotchbrite pads, and Sand paper. It depends on what I want to do to the ball or more imporantly what reaction I am trying to achieve. I personally use the following

Burgundy,grey, and white scotchbrite pads(Napa autoparts)

Wet/Dry sandpaper usually 3M imperial(Napa autoParts)
600,800,1000,1500,2000 grits
 
Polishes:I use Storm Diamond Gloss, Xtra shine, 3m Finesse it

Cleaners whatever suites your fancy.

I used some old equipment as test balls, and some of them have found a place back in my arsenal.

Hope that helps
Typhoon

"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve."


Typhoon

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Re: Ball Spinner 101
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2003, 02:44:46 PM »
Bob,


 I am not sure that sand paper does anything differently, from Scotchbrite pads, or trizact paper(I have never used trizact BTW). I use it to get a desired ball reaction. They recently changed over to Synthetics at my local center. I had my equipment at 600grit wet sanded then slightly polished with finesse it. When they switched over to synthetics I noticed that I had to play a really deeper line, so I have now sanded to 1,500 grit and have my equipment polished with storms Xtra shine. I hope that helps answer your question Bob.
"I fear all we have done is to awaken a sleeping giant and fill him with a terrible resolve."


10 In The Pit

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Re: Ball Spinner 101
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2003, 05:33:48 AM »
Trizact is used on Brunswick particle balls, due to the extra hardness of the ceramic particles that are used in the Brunswick particle coverstocks.  Normal wet-dry sandpaper and ScotchBrite are not hard enough to properly size the ceramic particles, so stick with Trizact on Brunswick particle balls, or for any other particle balls that Brunswick makes (such as Lane #1).

In general, ScotchBrite can be used from 120 grit up through 1200 grit, depending on which color pad you are using.  As a general guide, the lower grit values have a coarser mesh, and the higher grit values have a finer mesh.  With the exception of Brunswick made particle balls, it can be used on most anything else.  ScotchBrite is recommended on particle balls because it tends to erode down the coverstock, while leaving the particles more exposed for better traction.  ScotchBrite can be used either dry or wet....dry tends to give a more uniform surface, where wet can make the cutting more aggressive, but can leave deeper scratches in the surface.

Wet-dry sandpaper can be used from anywhere around 120 grit up through 2500 grit.....it works best with water added to keep the paper cleaned off.

As for polishes, well the sky is the limit here.  You can start off with the level of scuffing that is needed, then step up into the polishing range to the desired texture.

Bruce

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Re: Ball Spinner 101
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2003, 09:45:54 AM »
Thanks for the help everybody...ya'll have been a great help.

All of this info is getting me excited...I can't wait for my spinner to arrive so I can start experimenting!

Bruce