win a ball from Bowling.com

Author Topic: Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?  (Read 1696 times)

johns811

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1089
Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?
« on: September 21, 2021, 06:54:05 AM »
Anybody know what the difference is between casting epoxy vs ball plug. I want to buy like 1qt of plug and ball plug is not sold in small qty.

 

itsallaboutme

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1910
Re: Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2021, 06:34:18 AM »
The difference to be concerned with is curing temperature.  If you find a casting resin designed for larger items that cures cooler and slower it may work. 

Remember, there isn't much in bowling that is unique to bowling.  There are a lot of different epoxies out there.  I've seen guys fill holes with JB Weld.

johns811

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1089
Re: Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2021, 09:17:52 AM »
There is deep pour casting epoxy with very slow cure. I was afraid it might be brittle and chip/crack.

Bowler19525

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 652
Re: Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2021, 09:29:15 AM »
Anybody know what the difference is between casting epoxy vs ball plug. I want to buy like 1qt of plug and ball plug is not sold in small qty.

VISE offers a 1qt ball plug kit.  However at $80 it is kind of pricey.

USBC requires that ball plug material have a density in the range of 0.9-1.5g/ml.  Deep pour casting epoxy is around 1.1g/ml so it meets that density standard.  USBC also requires that plug must be made of material *like* the ball but not identical.  Is epoxy resin *like* urethane?  Urethane will stay a tad more flexible and not be as hard/brittle as epoxy resin.  If the ball isn't being used in sanctioned competition, then none of this matters  ;D 
« Last Edit: September 22, 2021, 09:56:38 AM by Bowler19525 »

johns811

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1089
Re: Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2021, 10:07:00 AM »
Ultimate before they must have been bought out by Brunswick had great customer service and sold me 1/2 gallon resin and hardener. I'm almost out. I wish they sold 1 qt bottles of the Wizard EZ, That would be perfect. I'd never use 2 gallon.

Bowler19525

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 652
Re: Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2021, 12:26:48 PM »
Ultimate before they must have been bought out by Brunswick had great customer service and sold me 1/2 gallon resin and hardener. I'm almost out. I wish they sold 1 qt bottles of the Wizard EZ, That would be perfect. I'd never use 2 gallon.

https://www.cheapbowlingballs.com/shop-supplies/rapid-cure-urethane-ball-plug-kit-1-4-gallon.html


JessN16

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3623
Re: Casting Epoxy resin vs ball plug?
« Reply #6 on: September 23, 2021, 12:51:10 PM »
Back when I plugged my own balls, there was a company called Dascar Plastics that made a two-part resin, called RP-40, used for pouring fast-curing molds. I used it in bowling balls for years and never had a problem with it even though it would harden in about 30 sec - 2 min and be drillable in a couple of hours. It punched 75 on ShoreD, so it was appropriate for USBC durometer specs.

The problem with it was color. You originally got one choice: white. Perfect for plugging AMF XS and Quantum Bias balls, problematic otherwise. Then, they started selling what they called "clear," (RP-40 MOD I think it was) but it wasn't clear, it had a yellow-tan tint to it. I never really tried to color it so I don't know how it would have taken to colors.

But you could get it 1 quart at a time (or 1 quart of base and 1 quart of hardener at a time, to be accurate). Good price, too.

Their website is apparently down, so I worry they're no longer in business. Several YouTube videos out there from people making stuff out of their resin. The times I dealt with them over the phone, they seemed like a very small operation. They used to ship their stuff in recycled motor oil quart containers.

Jess