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Author Topic: String Bowling  (Read 8401 times)

tank38

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String Bowling
« on: June 20, 2022, 01:34:17 PM »
We just had a local house install the string bowling machines and I have to say that this was my first time hearing anything about it but, I'm shocked this house would do this. I have never bowled with these machines and I was wondering what your thoughts were or if any of you had bowled on this before?

I'm not sure how I feel about it but it looks weird.

 

milorafferty

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #31 on: June 23, 2022, 02:16:38 PM »
Reading these comments, its a small miracle we are not still using wood bowling balls. If we are all competing on the same condition, does it really matter what condition that is? Not to the real competitors it doesn't.

Really? So the actual PBA bowlers are not "real competitors"?

Even today there are PBA bowlers who still bitch about two-handers, no thumb and urethane balls. I can only imagine the reaction to strings at the PBA level.
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Adrenaline

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #32 on: June 23, 2022, 02:41:35 PM »
Reading these comments, its a small miracle we are not still using wood bowling balls. If we are all competing on the same condition, does it really matter what condition that is? Not to the real competitors it doesn't.

You're confusing two completely different subjects.
The transition from wood balls, to rubber, to urethane, to resin were all advancements that moved the game forward.
People aren't resisting strings because they hate change, they're resisting strings because it's a step backwards in every aspect of the "bowlers" world.  (I can't argue the benefits they obviously have for owners\alleys\business)

Pretending that "all change" is the exact same, is an extremely close minded perspective to have.  If people were just resisting change (many of the bowling world does, so I completely understand why you're confused) then I would completely agree with you.  People crying about oil, resin, 2 hands... Old grumpy people stuck in the past, who refuse to accept the "advancing" of the game "for the good" of the sport.
This is the exact opposite scenario though.  This is a step backwards, to an inferior technology, with zero benefit to the competitive aspect of the sport, specifically done with the intent of turning higher profits.

Now, if you want to argue that the cost savings and profit are what are required to save the sport... You'd have a strong argument there.  We've all seen the number of alleys that have failed in the past 5 years, and obviously strings could have potentially altered the finances of them, so from that angle, I understand that strings may inevitably be the way the bowling world goes, but let's not pretend it's for the benefit of competing.  It's a blatant sacrifice to the validity of the game, in order to ensure the game survives.

2 very different things that you have to be able to differentiate.

tank38

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #33 on: June 23, 2022, 03:18:29 PM »
Reading these comments, its a small miracle we are not still using wood bowling balls. If we are all competing on the same condition, does it really matter what condition that is? Not to the real competitors it doesn't.

You're confusing two completely different subjects.
The transition from wood balls, to rubber, to urethane, to resin were all advancements that moved the game forward.
People aren't resisting strings because they hate change, they're resisting strings because it's a step backwards in every aspect of the "bowlers" world.  (I can't argue the benefits they obviously have for owners\alleys\business)

Pretending that "all change" is the exact same, is an extremely close minded perspective to have.  If people were just resisting change (many of the bowling world does, so I completely understand why you're confused) then I would completely agree with you.  People crying about oil, resin, 2 hands... Old grumpy people stuck in the past, who refuse to accept the "advancing" of the game "for the good" of the sport.
This is the exact opposite scenario though.  This is a step backwards, to an inferior technology, with zero benefit to the competitive aspect of the sport, specifically done with the intent of turning higher profits.

Now, if you want to argue that the cost savings and profit are what are required to save the sport... You'd have a strong argument there.  We've all seen the number of alleys that have failed in the past 5 years, and obviously strings could have potentially altered the finances of them, so from that angle, I understand that strings may inevitably be the way the bowling world goes, but let's not pretend it's for the benefit of competing.  It's a blatant sacrifice to the validity of the game, in order to ensure the game survives.

2 very different things that you have to be able to differentiate.
I was trying to come up with a response to opienva1's post and not cause an argument but this perfectly sums up what I wanted to say. (Better even) Awesome response Adrenaline.

SpinBowler300

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2022, 11:19:47 AM »
The whole point of this Bowlero/PBA League Bowling is to get String Pinsetters approved for league and tournament bowling. That's the only real beef that Bowlero has with the USBC. If the USBC approves String Pinsetters, this probably goes away.

In any event, all Bowlero center will have String Pinsetters in 5 to 10 years due to lower cost of maintenance. One way or the other, Bowlero is going to get it's way on String Pinsetters.
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opienva1

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #35 on: June 28, 2022, 06:34:53 AM »
If keeping cost down and centers open isn't good for the sport, Then I don't know what is.
Reading these comments, its a small miracle we are not still using wood bowling balls. If we are all competing on the same condition, does it really matter what condition that is? Not to the real competitors it doesn't.

You're confusing two completely different subjects.
The transition from wood balls, to rubber, to urethane, to resin were all advancements that moved the game forward.
People aren't resisting strings because they hate change, they're resisting strings because it's a step backwards in every aspect of the "bowlers" world.  (I can't argue the benefits they obviously have for owners\alleys\business)

Pretending that "all change" is the exact same, is an extremely close minded perspective to have.  If people were just resisting change (many of the bowling world does, so I completely understand why you're confused) then I would completely agree with you.  People crying about oil, resin, 2 hands... Old grumpy people stuck in the past, who refuse to accept the "advancing" of the game "for the good" of the sport.
This is the exact opposite scenario though.  This is a step backwards, to an inferior technology, with zero benefit to the competitive aspect of the sport, specifically done with the intent of turning higher profits.

Now, if you want to argue that the cost savings and profit are what are required to save the sport... You'd have a strong argument there.  We've all seen the number of alleys that have failed in the past 5 years, and obviously strings could have potentially altered the finances of them, so from that angle, I understand that strings may inevitably be the way the bowling world goes, but let's not pretend it's for the benefit of competing.  It's a blatant sacrifice to the validity of the game, in order to ensure the game survives.

2 very different things that you have to be able to differentiate.
I was trying to come up with a response to opienva1's post and not cause an argument but this perfectly sums up what I wanted to say. (Better even) Awesome response Adrenaline.

svengali

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2022, 11:55:06 PM »
Subbed in a center with string machines the last two weeks. I've been enjoying the 3-4 string assisted strikes I've been getting per set. Mostly flat 7 pins for me where the string gets tugged. I guess that's the new messenger strike. Averaging 247 for the 6 games, totally legit.

But the highlight of the night was seeing someone pick up the 2,8,10 by hitting the 2,8 dead on.
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JessN16

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #37 on: July 19, 2022, 02:06:04 AM »
I've got probably 20-30 years of good bowling left in me before I call it quits. I hope I'm able to avoid string houses for that long.

Strings are coming. Nothing any bowler can do about it. Bowlero is pushing it and a major part of the reason they are expanding the Certified League Bowler program and creating an equipment certification department is to get strings in. Once that happens, every Bowlero center will switch to strings as soon as the life cycle of the current equipment is up. The USBC will either go along with it or get buried by it.

I've seen strings in action firsthand although I've not bowled on them myself. It's different enough that I'd consider it a different game.

Jesse James

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #38 on: July 19, 2022, 08:53:24 AM »
So I've been closely following all the chatter about this string bowling.

What the heck is it? And can you describe it to me?

How is it different?
Some days you're the bug....some days you're the windshield...that's bowling!

LiverDance

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #39 on: July 19, 2022, 12:05:26 PM »

bradl

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #40 on: July 19, 2022, 05:46:38 PM »
If keeping cost down and centers open isn't good for the sport, Then I don't know what is.

You need to watch some of the overseas tournaments from the JPBA, KPBA, and Rankseeker. They know how to keep their tournaments packed, and by extension, their bowling centers. Cost doesn't seem to be prohibitive for them, because they've kept this marketed as a competitive sport. What has failed us here in the US is business thinking that they know better than the sport, and screwing over the sport, let alone the industry.

I mean, again from the CEO of the company pushing the PBA certification program and the entire concept of string bowling (as it has been put here):

No one cares about bowling. - Tom Shannon, CEO of Bowlero

There's the problem.

BL.



Bowler19525

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Re: String Bowling
« Reply #41 on: July 19, 2022, 06:09:10 PM »
Bowling in Japan is also considered a licensed, certified profession.  It is literally a job.
  In the US, anyone with a 200+ average can get their PBA card and give it a run.  Bowling in the US just doesn't have the same level of respect and professionalism that it does in other countries.