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Author Topic: Trying to still be me in a changing sport  (Read 1589 times)

bcw1969

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Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« on: October 25, 2018, 03:08:31 PM »
In another thread Avbob said this ......

"Todays environment rewards high speed and high revs."

I am neither one...a little over a year ago kegel training center clocked me at a 196 rev rate, and I don't have much speed and I have somewhat short arms and not a big backswing, but I do have quite a bit of side rotation.  For the most part it seems that the ball companies these days are catering mainly to the player I am not.  It seems that lately I am "fighting" to still be me in an environment that is not making it easy to do so.

can anyone else relate?

Brad

 

avabob

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Re: Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« Reply #16 on: October 31, 2018, 11:35:17 AM »
Blue Triton was a real innovation when introduced.  First super low rg core.   As for new equipment, dont over think it.  Todays balls run the gamut from super strong shells and cores to stuff not much different than your triton.  Find a ball that matches your game on conditions you normally see, dont try to change your game to match some hook monster ball that you dont match up with.

BeerLeague

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Re: Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« Reply #17 on: November 05, 2018, 08:49:42 AM »
I say we go back to short oil and shotmaking.

Could you imagine the "power players" of today being forced right of 10?  I chuckle to think about it.  The 230 average "house pros" would all of a sudden be shooting 450's.

I always felt the short oil days rewarded all styles... "Crankers" could move in when required and the straighter players could use their accuracy to play near the gutter.  I felt that era was the most "equal" .. but that's just me.

Hand position changes, 1/2 board adjustments, whatever it took to get the corners out ... I miss those days.


avabob

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Re: Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« Reply #18 on: November 05, 2018, 10:41:42 AM »
Sorry, but we remember short oil a bit differently.  80s were the era of crank to the bank one hit wonders on tour.  If you cupped your wrist enough spares were irrelevant.   At the local level I vividly remember bowling a 6 game sweeper where I missed cashing by 50 pins despite only 4 opens in the set.  A couple of guys who cashed had at least 10 opens.  The carry advantage for crankers was almost insurmountable over more than 3 or 4 games.
« Last Edit: November 05, 2018, 10:44:14 AM by avabob »

Impending Doom

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Re: Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« Reply #19 on: November 05, 2018, 10:50:37 AM »
No one will ever admit this, but Bill Taylor was right.
2018-19 900 Global Advisory Staffer

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squirrelywrath1

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Re: Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« Reply #20 on: November 05, 2018, 11:28:16 AM »
Sorry, but we remember short oil a bit differently.  80s were the era of crank to the bank one hit wonders on tour.  If you cupped your wrist enough spares were irrelevant.   At the local level I vividly remember bowling a 6 game sweeper where I missed cashing by 50 pins despite only 4 opens in the set.  A couple of guys who cashed had at least 10 opens.  The carry advantage for crankers was almost insurmountable over more than 3 or 4 games.


Just to add, one of the best examples of a "crank to the bank" style player is Bob Vespi.  I seem to remember one week where he missed 17  ten-pins over 42 games but still LED the tournament.  YIKES!

avabob

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Re: Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« Reply #21 on: November 05, 2018, 11:35:12 AM »
Bill Taylor was brilliant,  and right snout many things.   However his major arguments were against the double voided laminated pins.  He calked them pinettes, and argued that it allowed weaker deliveries to carry where they would not have on the solid pins of an earlier generation.  I think evidence would show that scoring did not go up much on the newer pins, and the reason for the emergence of straighter players was more about lane surfaces.   You can make a strong argument that changing lane surfaces dictated the major style changes that have evolved over the years.   Pins are more lively today, and certainly have had some impact because of the way they accelerate.  However some of that is offset by them going airborne quicker causing more ringing hard tens.

avabob

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Re: Trying to still be me in a changing sport
« Reply #22 on: November 05, 2018, 11:37:00 AM »
Holman once said that he couldnt blow enough 10s to miss a cut on most of the conditions he hit during the 80s.