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Author Topic: USBC Waives Regarding Alcohol and Lane Requirements for Leagues and Tournaments  (Read 2333 times)

bradl

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This just in, from The Chad:

https://bit.ly/2xFrTbw

Quote
USBC MODIFIES RULES TO HELP ALLOW A RETURN TO COMPETITIVE BOWLING

Terry Bigham
May 6, 2020

Changes include waiving alternating lane requirement and
approving use of isopropyl alcohol to clean bowling balls

ARLINGTON, Texas –
The United States Bowling Congress Board of Directors approved waivers and modifications to USBC Playing Rules to allow certified leagues and tournaments more flexibility to return to bowling while adhering to local health guidelines related to COVID-19. 

The modifications allow certified competition to take place on one lane for the entirety of a game. Additionally, bowlers will be allowed to use isopropyl alcohol, more commonly known as rubbing alcohol, to clean their bowling ball during competition. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) lists isopropyl alcohol as an approved disinfectant for use against COVID-19.

“As bowling centers around the country are reopening, USBC intends to give operators the most flexibility possible to resume bowling within their local guidelines,” USBC Executive Director Chad Murphy said. “We have been listening to proprietors and members as they prepare to resume certified play and made these changes based on that input. Our goal is to facilitate bowling again in a way that meets the need locally and USBC is ready to quickly consider and activate additional changes based on feedback from centers and associations.”

The USBC Board has the authority to temporarily amend or suspend league and tournament rules in emergency cases. With the current coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, USBC reviewed its rules and policies to identify areas of concern relating to player safety and to determine how it could promote efforts while centers adjust operations to meet local guidelines.

Effective immediately, USBC has temporarily waived USBC Playing Rules 106a, 106b, 320a and 320b, which state two lanes must be used for competition and bowlers must alternate lanes – bowling five frames on each lane of the pair. It also waived the requirement that both lanes must be used for a bowler to be eligible for awards and average recognition.

The temporary waiver allows competitions to use one lane for the entirety of a game and allows recognition of scores bowled on a single lane for USBC High Score Awards and for a bowler’s official average.

USBC will continue to monitor the COVID-19 pandemic and can rescind the waiver of Rules 106a,106b, 320a and 320b at any time.

USBC also created an exception for Rule 18, which restricts the use of liquid cleaners to clean the outer surface of the bowling ball during USBC certified competition. The exception for Rule 18 applies only to isopropyl alcohol – no other USBC-approved cleaners will be allowed during competition.

The USBC Board, which has the authority over General Playing Rules, was able to make the rules waivers following the adoption of General Playing Rule 14 - Emergency Authorizations. Rule 14 states USBC may authorize temporary modifications to the General Playing Rules, Award, League and Tournament Rules in cases of emergency and that such authorizations will be for a specified period.

Visit BOWL.com/Rules for more information on USBC Rules.

The alcohol rule I can see, as is just common sense there. The alternating lane waiver leaves a lot to be abused. If at a tournament, say City, State, or Nationals, and you have the ability to work a single lane for an entire game? Let's say you alternate a lane per game.. the opposing team struggles on the fresh while you create the shim, next game, they work it better while you're on the fresh that they struggled with, then get back to the lane you created the shim that they've now subsequently wrecked?

I don't have an answer for what they're thinking, but if done right, especially with lane courtesy, social distancing can still be adhered to while alternating lanes, keeping that rule intact. If they're really worried, they could put a one-pair buffer between lanes and be able to get games done faster, so they can add an additional squad in to the day.

Again, Not sure what they're thinking there, but but the alcohol rule makes sense. Outside of that, consider this a placeholder for more jokes about The Chad.

BL.

 

svengali

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The alcohol rule I can see, as is just common sense there. The alternating lane waiver leaves a lot to be abused. If at a tournament, say City, State, or Nationals, and you have the ability to work a single lane for an entire game? Let's say you alternate a lane per game.. the opposing team struggles on the fresh while you create the shim, next game, they work it better while you're on the fresh that they struggled with, then get back to the lane you created the shim that they've now subsequently wrecked?

There won't be any switching lanes. The team will bowl on one lane the entire set. First squad bowls on the odd lanes. Then the second squad comes in and bowls on the even lanes. That way everyone gets fresh oil to start and a 1 lane buffer.
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Bowler19525

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I saw an article in the news last night that the state of Tennessee is reopening bowling centers on Friday, however leagues will not be permitted to prevent gathering of groups.  Bowlers must wear masks, one empty lane between bowlers, one door to go in the center, exit through another door, etc.  So basically, open bowling only.  Hopefully this is an exception rather than the "new normal".

The USBC can change rules all they want, they are at the mercy of the states to decide whether or not bowling will be allowed.
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ignitebowling

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Now alcohol isn't an integrity issue?  Their ability to make random stupid rules is endless.
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Bowler19525

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It can only be used to clean the outer surface of bowling balls.  So I guess you can't clean/disinfect inside the finger holes and grips where a lot of the germs and dirt build up during competition.  Sure, ok, makes a lot of sense?

I am surprised they didn't try to stipulate what strength(s) would be permitted...70%, 91%, 80%, 99%, etc.
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Luke Rosdahl

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Why would you not be able to clean inside the fingerholes . . there was never any rule against cleaning the inside of your fingerholes to begin with, so therefore no reason to make an exception. 

It can only be used to clean the outer surface of bowling balls.  So I guess you can't clean/disinfect inside the finger holes and grips where a lot of the germs and dirt build up during competition.  Sure, ok, makes a lot of sense?

I am surprised they didn't try to stipulate what strength(s) would be permitted...70%, 91%, 80%, 99%, etc.
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Impending Doom

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I read the title of this post with much more initial interest.

bergman

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You can still clean your finger holes with alcohol. The intent of Rule 18 hasn't changed.
That rule was (and still is) intended to stop the practice of altering the ball's surface during competition. It has nothing to do with the finger holes and never did. The only change to that rule is that a bowler is now permitted to use isopropyl alcohol to clean the ball's surface during competition and no other cleaner. Given the easy transmission of the Coronavirus, I applaud this new rule. It's a compromise but in the face of a much more serious issue (Covid-19), it's a wise one. It appears that this was their intent. Alcohol not only can be used as a cleaner but it's also a very effective sanitizer-- for both, the ball's surface and the fingerholes,something that's needed at the present time.  This is how I interpret the modified rule.

Bowler19525

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So the dry towel rule didn't apply to finger holes, only the surface?  So prior to the waiver, a bowler could use a cleaner to clean inside finger holes but not the surface of the ball?  Just another example of the USBC creating needlessly complicated, unenforceable rules.

Imagine how that conversation will go when the waiver is lifted.  "Hey! You can't use a cleaner during competition!". "I'm not using it on the ball, I'm cleaning my finger holes."
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Impending Doom

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Rules like this is why we can't have nice things.

jimjames

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Conversations like this is getting to be in the latter stages of OP is like, radical, as in beyond ridiculous.  ::)

bradl

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I read the title of this post with much more initial interest.

I did too, until they got to the part that said "isopropyl." I was beginning to laugh at the prospect of all of those Storm balls smelling like a drunk fruit.  ;)

BL.

Gene J Kanak

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As was stated, they are making these exceptions for the time being to try to give bowlers and bowling centers as many options as possible to allow for competitive bowling. It's not a perfect scenario by any means, but that's why it's an exception. Under normal circumstances, these measures aren't allowed. We aren't operating under anything close to normal circumstances, so they're doing whatever they can to try to make it possible for bowlers to bowl/compete while still being responsible. Also, keep in mind that it didn't say that leagues/centers were required to apply these exceptions; they are options that they're being given.

As is the case with anything, you're free to form your own opinions. However, some of you guys and gals are clearly exhibiting genetic fallacy = you hate USBC, so anything they do is automatically bad/wrong. Have whatever opinion of USBC that you want to have, but this idea makes sense for the time being. 

Bowler19525

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As was stated, they are making these exceptions for the time being to try to give bowlers and bowling centers as many options as possible to allow for competitive bowling. It's not a perfect scenario by any means, but that's why it's an exception. Under normal circumstances, these measures aren't allowed. We aren't operating under anything close to normal circumstances, so they're doing whatever they can to try to make it possible for bowlers to bowl/compete while still being responsible. Also, keep in mind that it didn't say that leagues/centers were required to apply these exceptions; they are options that they're being given.

As is the case with anything, you're free to form your own opinions. However, some of you guys and gals are clearly exhibiting genetic fallacy = you hate USBC, so anything they do is automatically bad/wrong. Have whatever opinion of USBC that you want to have, but this idea makes sense for the time being. 

The waivers make sense and are definitely an option.  The truth of the matter is that bowling centers are kind of "stuck" right now.  Some states opened bowling centers, but banned leagues until further notice.  Some states have reopened bowling centers, but banned groups larger than 25.  Most states are putting occupancy limits on bowling centers when reopening.  Some states haven't even committed yet to opening bowling centers.  Centers that rely heavily on leagues for recurring revenue are really at a disadvantage.  The house I bowl in is a very heavy league house.  There are nights when there are 300+ people in there.  Doesn't matter what the USBC does, that type of crowd will not be allowed for the foreseeable future in our "new normal".

Using one lane per team is an option, but in a house with 24 lanes where all lanes are in use for leagues, it will not work when a state requires an empty lane between each occupied lane.  Now a house is down to 12 lanes that can be used at any given time.  League sizes will drop, revenue will drop, and the bowling center will have to either stay open longer and have multiple shifts to accommodate the bowlers or try to survive on less business [or open bowling only.]  There is simply nothing the USBC can do in those cases to help out.

It isn't that there is pure hate for the USBC, there is hate for the way it operates.  They regulate the game and change/amend the rulebook ad nauseam.  They can never make up their mind as to what needs to be regulated more (lane conditions, equipment, etc.) In the meantime, the local associations are kind of left out there on their own to do "whatever".  I have seen first hand how our local association operates, and it is mind boggling.  There are people in the association that have a true, earnest love for bowling and do everything they can to grow and promote the sport.  There are others that are drunk with power and feel they have some sort of "authority" over everyone else instead of making it a collaborative endeavor.

The USBC needs to seriously think about having a group of people who lobby the states on behalf of the bowling centers and bowlers to convince state authorities that bowling can be reopened responsibly.  A pandemic task force, if you will.  If they can get national association representatives to work on that, that would be worthwhile.  If they want a future for the sport, they should get out there and do some of the grass roots work to help push it along.
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