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Author Topic: New bowling challenge  (Read 5057 times)

ignitebowling

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New bowling challenge
« on: April 21, 2022, 10:26:49 AM »


How long can you last listening to the above interview? I made it 32minutes this morning at work with it going in the background then tapped out.
Ignite your game, and set the lanes on fire. www.facebook.com/ignitebowling  or @ignite_bowling

 

ignitebowling

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Re: New bowling challenge
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2022, 11:02:13 AM »
Very true. I started bowling in the early 1960s. Wood lanes with lacquer finishes.

Prior to the start of the 1973 league season, the house I bowled in converted to urethane lane finishes (coatings). Suddenly overnight, our hard rubber/plastic balls skidded
 all the way to the pin decks. It was like bowling on oil-covered concrete. The house used a Brunswick (B-90) oil applicator back then. Averages plummeted. It got so bad that the house abandoned the B-90 and went back to hand-oiling (which only made it  worse). 

In desperation, the house cut the applicator brushes on the B-90 applicator. This allowed for less oil on the outsides. This was still illegal under the ABC rules, but many houses were desperate as more and more league bowlers began to complain.
The ABC was facing a dilemma and it wasn't until 1977 that they began relaxing the rules and started to allow houses to increase the oil crown. Immediately, averages and scores took off, aided also by the introduction of softer rubber and plastic balls
(particularly, the Brunswick LT-48 and the Columbia Yellow Dot). That was the turning point that started the high scoring revolution that continues to this day.

I mention this not as a complaint. Quite the opposite. I'm just stating history.
Back then, hook was measured in millimeters, due to the lane conditions and the equipment that existed at that time. I recall the great Don Johnson replying to his son, who was watching his dad bowl in a PBA event in an old 1967 video. His son said, "You guys really threw it straight in those days" to which Don replied, "Son, back then, we called that HOOK!"

Great stuff. Most dont go back and look at how bowlers forms and mechanics have changed through the decades to create the power of today. Imagine guys with 450 rpm rev rate bowling during that time. Its going to create more area. In any era for that matter. If Earl Anthony started bowling in this era hou can bet he would have over 400rpms and he would be hard to beat on tour today or in any era.
Ignite your game, and set the lanes on fire. www.facebook.com/ignitebowling  or @ignite_bowling

avabob

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Re: New bowling challenge
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2022, 01:43:48 PM »
Absolutely fantastic post Bergman.  Actually ABC was still mandating flat oil until after 1980.  Most local secretaries didn't enforce it on award scores unless they were blocked off the corner.  I had my first 2 300 games 1976 and 77 with a hard caramel on a dead wall.  Local small town secretaries weren't going to enforce the bad rule.  Wearing my 300 ring from 1976 as I post this
« Last Edit: April 23, 2022, 06:31:07 PM by avabob »

bowling4burgers

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Re: New bowling challenge
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2022, 07:52:33 AM »
They tried this with "Vintage Class" and "Super Class" in disc golf/Frisbee golf. Spoiler alert: approximately nobody plays those versions.

It's a similar problem actually -- overpowered discs and pros make old courses designed for Frisbees way too easy, so they just make new courses longer and sometimes add artificial OB to compensate. Fun to casually play an old course with old Frisbees, but the game has radically changed since the 70s and won't go back.

I'd think Voss's initiative would be equally successful. Might be fun once in a while to throw a Mineralite in an old center, but that's it.
The Future of Bowling: Bowling is a once-popular tavern game played with a heavy ball and ten pins.