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Author Topic: Thunder Flash  (Read 13497 times)

admin

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Thunder Flash
« on: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM »
Ball NPS Score: Not Available
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Storm has combined a high performance Thunder weight block with FE2 technology and an aggressive conventional urethane for Thunderous results. The Thunder Flash produces strong flare potential and even transition for superior performance and control. Thunder Flash will be designated by a green pin. Factory Finish: 600 grit wet sand; Radius of Gyration: 2.565 (Medium); Differential: .055 (High); Hook Potential: 15/10 (Dull/Shiny).

 

C-Mac

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #1 on: February 01, 2000, 01:00:00 AM »
There is a plus and minus to the ball. The plus......Thunder weight block for high flare/hook potential help the weaker conventional urethane cover in the hit department, and it's reasonably cheap for the simulated "proactive" roll it gives you. The minus.......it says Storm on it for one, and though it's cheap compared to the vast majority of all balls, it's over priced as a urethane. I can go get a Columbia Stingray for $20 and be just as satisfied with leaving flat 10's and 8's. Total savings=over $100. In conclusion:save your money unless the condition you're bowling on just calls for hook-at-your-toes reaction or go find a Stringray......better yet, comb the racks at the alley for a Blue or Burgundy Hammer.

Paul Meyer

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2000, 01:00:00 AM »
This is ball is amazing. This is something urethane balls have always lacked...a huge weight block.  This ball is incredible with the amount of flare potential it can generate.  I have drilled two of these balls, one was over the label with pin at 1 o'clock and the other was drilled axis leverage. The label drilling works best on an easy shot whereas the axis-leverage drill pattern work excellent on spotty lanes.  This has to be the bag for any bowler who has hand in the ball.  This ball has trememndous carry potential and overhook is never a problem with this ball.

Jerry Weller

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2000, 02:00:00 AM »
Most impressive urethane ball I have ever thrown. The first surprise I had was that this ball hooks a lot for urethane! Be prepared to move about 5 boards left of where you would be with your old trusty Blue Hammer. This ball can handle medium to somewhat heavy oil with factory surface.

The Thunder Flash comes back harder than some resin I have seen and will allow you to create some area to the outside of the lane, but with a very even rolling controllable arching reaction. The ball also has enough guts to finish if you tug it into the oil a little, but don't expect it to hold on line if you really yank it.

Caveat: The Thunder Flash will leave 10 pins if you don't have head oil, but if you do have some head oil you will see this ball scatter messengers around the pindeck.

For the record, my Thunder Flash was 2" pin out, drilled label leverage. The ball produced plenty of track flare to handle those wet backends with a nice even urethane roll and reaction even on screaming backends.

See my review on the Thunder Flash Pro for more.

CRSmith

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2001, 10:15:12 PM »
My Thunderflash replaces my old original blue Hammer. I wanted something with the hook potential of a resin ball, but not the inconsistency on tricky conditions. This ball hits like a truck. Pins fly. Not what I expected from urethane. I've used it both polished and sanded for various conditions, and it performed well both ways. You forget that you're throwing a urethane ball when you watch it hit the pocket. The ball is drilled stacked leverage with the pin just outside my ring finger. Track flare is about 5". Dull, the ball gets decent length and rolls up earlier. Polished it goes longer before getting into its roll. The surface is easily modified unlike earlier urethane balls. I've used it on both wetter and drier shots. Great addition to any arsenal.

Deadbait

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2001, 12:01:45 AM »
15# ball, pin out 3 inches, 3.5 TW
Pin above ring finger 1/2 inch, cg at 12 o'clock.  cover is 600 sand with the track, sheened with a wool sock.  Too strong a drill for dry backends.  Reacts to the dry too fast and too dramatic.  On some carrydown it is too weak.  If drilling for a dry condition try a weak drilling, pin in the track maybe.  Shined the ball with Black Magic over a 1400 sand and it really got wild on a dry backend.  Slid like crazy on carrydown.  Think I will sell this one to someone with weaker hand.  To sum up, real strong on fresh backends, pretty skittish on carrydown with weak hits.      Luck   Bullred

Deadbait

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2001, 10:57:21 PM »
after playing with this ball will try to evalulate again.  Think I would put a tamer drill in next one. Pin and cg around the midline. This ball will skid/flip with the bext of them, but as soon as a little carrydown shows up it hits weak.  Plays wet/dry with the best.   Hits well if the backend is clean.
If you shine it up really gets skid flippy.  Great if the back ends are clean.
Have it sanded 800 grit now.  For general all around play seems OK.  Wish Storm would have put a weaker core in ball.   Seems like the core kind of overloads the cover a little.

Strider

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2001, 12:31:20 AM »
I bought this ball used from Buddies Pro Shop.

Ball: 15#, 2" pin, 3 oz top weight.
Drilling: Pin 2" outside, 1" below ring finger, CG below and to the left of the pin at a 45 degree angle.

Both houses I bowl at have synthetic lanes.  House #1 oils to 40' with pretty clean backends.  House #2 oils to 42' and must buff farther down.  You need to have a ball with a strong backend to score well at #2.  Neither house has much of a wall.  Miss a few boards to the right and you will miss the head pin.

So far I have left the surface the way I received it.  Storm ships at 600 grit, but I think it's more like 800-1000.  I originally wanted a control ball for when the lanes break down (reverse block or carry down).  I thought I would gloss it up, but I really like the reaction dull.  They must be oiling farther down the lane or using more units this year.  Last year I could hook my Cherry C2 (Buzzsaw) across the lane and this year I have barely used it.  I only had it part of the year and kept it glossed, so I don't think it's worn out or absorbed a lot of oil.  ...back to the Thunderflash.

I have used this ball a lot at house #1.  Typically I finish at 25, target 12, and swing to about 5.  House #1 has enough backend to hit the pocket and carry.  High hits tend to leave only a 4 (not as many splits as a reactive ball) and light hits will still scatter the pins.

I haven't had as much success at house #2.  The ball hooks fine, but doesn't carry as well.  Even if I tighten up the line, I've left a few more solid 10's than I thought I deserved.  My Messenger Titanium (dulled with liquid sandpaper, drilled 3 3/8 x 3 3/8) does much better.

Overall I like the ball very much.  It starts hooking much earlier than resin and does not snap on the backend.  It is the definition of the word arc.  It does get into a very heavy roll, so it will still cut right through the heart if you crush the nose.  If you chuck it real wide, it doesn't have the recovery of resin, so you will not carry the 2 pin messenger shot.  Even so, it will keep you in the pocket, and if the conditions are right, it will carry as well as anything else you've got.  I even like to throw it when it doesn't carry as well as my Messenger Titanium, but I'm not throwing consistent enough to keep the resin ball in the pocket.
--------------------
Strider
Penn State Proud

Deadbait

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #8 on: September 27, 2001, 12:18:25 AM »
One more time on this ball.   The reason I keep coming back is, I think this ball is the answer to a lot of "housebowlers" prayers.  I just couldn't seem to get the right cover.  Using a 600 grit with the track (still same 3 3/8 stacked drill)  Have determined that for me the ball doesn't like axis rotation.  Have started using the ball with more forward roll off the hand and this ball is beginning to do it's thing.   Had 647,708,677,686 the last four outings on a synthetic christmas tree type shot.  I still think I will drill one with the pin and cg at 5" and have a monster for a housetype shot.By the way, clean this ball just like you would a resin.  It is a first cousin to a resin and soaks oil and dirt pretty good.      Luck

BrianN

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #9 on: December 02, 2001, 07:22:50 PM »
I bought it to combat a severe over/under condition and to throw on an inside line on a reverse block. It didn't make sense to buy another resin ball for these purposes. I decided to try urethane and chose the Thunderflash because of its strong core.

Every review says this, and no one seems to believe it, so - one more time: get rid of the idea that Thunderflash is a weak ball. In a reasonable layout with box finish, it is a versatile medium oil ball. I can imagine how it would be a monster in an aggressive drilling. To quote the drill sheet: "Feel free to drill the Thunder Flash as you would any high flare potential ball. Use extreme caution when deciding where to place the weight hole - the Thunder Flash can flare up to 13 inches." I'm sure Storm intends this as a statement about high RG diff balls (2.565 RG, .055 RG diff in this case), but I wouldn't want call their bluff either.  

While I'm thinking about it, the drill sheet is a model for other companies. Unlike Columbia's generic document, Storm makes a 6-page drill sheet specific to this ball. It presents 12 layouts, tells you how each of them will behave and makes some very specific suggestions how you'd apply them. Stuff like - Use one of these layouts if you have freshly stripped and heavily oiled lanes, or wet/dry conditions where you are forced to play an outside angle. Not everybody will need this information, but I really appreciated it. When your ball arrives, it might be a good idea to hold off drilling it for a day while you absorb this material.

Mine is 16#, 3.3oz top weight, 3" pinout. I had two very different jobs in mind, but the common theme was that I would take all the revs out of it and play the ball on a tight line around 3rd arrow. I wanted to pitch it out flat and let the coverstock and core do their thing. Therefore, I chose a 5 x 5, with the pin above the bridge and the CG out only fractionally about 3/8". With a weight hole, the statics came to 1/2 oz positive. The closest-looking thing in the drill sheets is their so-called "Warm Front Thunder" layout # 3. I shined it to 1200 after this proved stronger than I thought.

Thunderflash gives you a different look than pearl resin. It wants to be an early, strong, arcing ball, and it's a bad idea to attempt to make it into something else. If you absolutely must have a skid/snap ball, buy something else - you will not be happy with the TFlash. For me, it gives an arc/set/heavy roll reaction that is effective on many different conditions.  

As long as it has some head oil to work with, it can be used on nearly anything up to medium oil. With dry heads, however, it will want to roll too early - put it away.

The single best thing about this ball, its real virtue, is that it is insensitive to the state of the backends. TFlash behaves very consistently through spotty, carrydown or flying backends. Whereas all the resin I own likes to be played only a certain way; i.e., only down and in, only swung, TFlash doesn't care about the angle of attack. In my experience, it produces an effective hit anywhere from 7 - 25. Mine seems exceptionally tolerant of high hits, carrying more trip-4s than anything else I own, yet leaves no more corners than my resin.

I would classify the hit and carry as very good, but not great. It is not as strong as the best resin, but stronger than any lightbulb core I've ever thrown.  

I'm giving it a high 8. It's tough to reduce a unique piece of equipment like this to a single number. For the job it does, there are maybe two good choices and many bad ones. Here's how I break it out:

Control - 8. Despite its strength, a fairly controllable ball under a broad range of conditions.

Versatility - 9. Covers a great deal of ground, all the way from lightest to medium heavy oil, but must have head oil. At its best with inconsistent backends. A lot of different people could find it useful - down the boards, swing shot, strong layout and no hand, weak layout and much hand, a single ball for the minimalist and so forth.

Hit - 8. Tolerant of high hits, not quite as good as the best resin.

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Updated 3/12/2003:

After throwing Thunder Flash for 18 months, here are some additional thoughts.

I originally had it stacked over the bridge. When I was sure I wouldn't see that particular shot again, I redrilled it to 4 1/2 x 3 with a weight hole. The latter drilling is very strong, and probably preferable for a general purpose ball.

I have tried about every surface imaginable. You can make actually make a passable resin substitute out of it with a lot of polish. However, for me, the core lopes too much to be effective with as much skid/flip as it produces. My impression was that Storm designed this to balance the strong coverstock with a high-differential loping core. This style of core doesn't work for me in most other Storm balls,  but it does with this one because of the strong surface.

My favorite surface on it is 800 grit. Depending on the situation, I may play it anywhere between 600 and 1000. I had reasonable success on a sport shot and a house shot on the same synthetic lanes at both 800 and 1000. I could get it to the pocket with either, but I think 800 carried better. While it's somewhat difficult to polish and resurface, it's a cinch to take down. So now, I keep an array of scotchbrite pads in the bag. n gloss in minutes.

Thunder Flash doesn't like me to hit it all that hard at the bottom of the swing. I thought for a while it was working best when I took a little something off it, but on further reflection, it's actually that my hand is relaxed, at the top of the swing, the release and the followthrough. It's a mistake to fight it by trying to make it rev early.

It's still my favorite ball on some, not all, difficult conditions. Despite the flare, it seemed a good choice on my two sport shots. If I were going to spend significant time on a light/medium sport shot again, I think I'd put a modest drill on one of my Thunder Flash Pros.  

I can't truthfully say there's one specific condition it's made for. I like it pretty much anytime you have to be concerned with something overreacting to the dry, like maybe a hard wet dry you need to bounce off of, super-dry backends before they smooth out, shorter pattens in general, or a dry track area after several games. It can also handle a moderate amount of carrydown. I don't like it on longer oil, lots of carrydown or dry heads.

Several people have questioned the carry. I think the carry is somewhat spotty. In transition or carrydown, if I hit it hard at the bottom, or if I play a severe inside line, it may ping lots of 10s. But typically the reason you're throwing it is that it's so hard to get to the pocket, carry is a secondary concern.
The budget should be balanced, the treasury refilled, public debt reduced, the arrogance of officialdom tempered and controlled, and the assistance to foreign lands curtailed, lest Rome become bankrupt.  
 
-- Cicero, Roman statesman

tonygee

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #10 on: December 27, 2001, 05:20:26 PM »
Drilled: 12:00 stacked both under ring finger ~1 oz pos side
Waxed not polished at factory 600grit

Reacts like particle down to the number of boards covered.  When this monster begins its motion towards the pocket it is a Strong Moving HOOK, my Blue Hammer arcs but this baby Hooks (meaning stronger than arc but weaker than snap), have only used it during practice but will definitely be in my tournament bag, will update on how it moves in tourney conditions.

Oh and it hits like resin and particle, this baby is NOT weak

tonygee

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #11 on: February 25, 2002, 02:48:46 PM »
update to my last review, as I have mentioned, this ball covers the boards a strong reactive covers, BUT the difference is that the energy is not stored the same and is dispersed a little more evenly thus occasionally when I play swing lines 18 and deeper to 5 at the break it would leave me corners and if going in high it would leave me an 8 or 9.  
When I am able to play 15 and out at the arrows though and break at 5 this is the right stuff.
I love this shape core and this ball is still in my bag when I go to tourneys because mainly if gives me less over/under but still have punch (again for specific conditions)

kRossAnt

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2002, 06:55:55 PM »
I'm a beginning bowler and this was the first ball that I got. Pin placement was 1"-1 1/2" and was drilled to give decent hook but plenty of control as well. I must say that I am impressed.

Bowled with out of the box condition on typical house pattern (with medium oil, stripped backends). The control of the Thunder Flash is impeccable and gives decent hook at the end as well. Also, this thing hits hard; the pins just fly when it crushes the pocket. I bowled 6 games and the average of the 6 games was 25 pins more than my average with a straight ball. And this was the first time I threw a ball drilled fingertip.

As a beginner, I would recommend this ball to all beginners without any hesitation. It is just a great overall ball with the superior control of urethane combined with the hit of a very good reactive ball. Overall a great ball from Storm; I give it a  9.5 out of 10.

kRossAnt

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Re: Thunder Flash
« Reply #13 on: May 03, 2002, 10:34:48 PM »
SPECS
14 lb. 5 oz.
2.98 top weight
1"- 1 1/2" pin


Wow...this is truly an amazing ball. After a little more than a month of using this ball (racking up over 80 games), I have noticed this ball only gets better and better. I bowl in a house with medium oiled lanes, in a christmas tree pattern, buffed out to anywhere from 34' to 40'. The Thunder Flash's ability to skid through the first 40 feet and EXPLODE on the backend is incredible. In addition, this ball totally takes the backends out of play. Through bone dry backends, or carrydown, this ball will cut through it and make a perfect entry into the pocket. The Thunder Flash is very forgiving; I can miss 4 or 5 boards outside and it will come screaming back flush in the pocket.

As in my last review, I stated this is the first non-plastic bowling ball I've owned and since getting this ball, my average has jumped 60 pins. I have found the Tflash works best when sanded to 800 grit (for medium oil). The cover is easily adjustable, which is an extra incentive to an already great ball.

Last but certainly not least, this ball carries tremendously well. Even on light hits, the ball just shatters the deck and has the pins screaming out in mercy. WOW!!! This ball is the best and I give it a perfect 10 outta 10! Get this ball if you have the chance, since Storm has stopped production of this ball.


kRoss