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Author Topic: Surface changes  (Read 3431 times)

300 dan

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Surface changes
« on: July 02, 2017, 06:59:56 PM »
Anyone do any surface changes to The Crow ? If so what were the changes and how did the urethane cover take to those changes ?

 

scotts33

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Re: Surface changes
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2017, 06:33:58 AM »
Since no one answered your question since July...I will attempt to answer with my experience with The Crow.  I don't find many urethanes whether The Crow or another urethane tend to take changes easily.  I have left mine OOB and find the ball was designed for medium house shots especially works well for me on wet/dry walls.  Takes away the over/under of such THS lane conditions.  One will need a Shammy that works better than a towel to take away the residual oil as it will stand on the ball surface.   
Scott

300 dan

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Re: Surface changes
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2017, 05:18:58 PM »
Thanks Scott I've also left mine OOB tried to use it couple times on my house shot but it's a little strong for our normal house shot. I have used it on some sport and modified shots and works well.

Thanks Dan

HackJandy

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Re: Surface changes
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2017, 10:35:55 PM »
Except maybe for a once a year resurface I hit all my urethanes every three to five sessions or so with either a brown 240 grit scotch brite or a 500 or so grit maroon scotch brite depending on the ball, always only by hand (too easy to wear down a urethane long term with a spinner with low grits).  For the Crow I go with the 500 maroon probably closer to every third session for maybe 5 minutes tops.  Since I tend to be speed dominant mostly bowling on newer synthetic lanes with decent oil I for the most part can't have too much surface on my urethanes.  Also I have found the older urethane tends to hold its surface much better than newer urethane.  For example The Crow requires surface added even more often than my older Burgundy Hammer which was about the softest Faball urethane back in the day.   Still both hold their surface far better than the new Burgundy Hammer which pretty much requires a quick maroon pad go over after every session.  Its so soft though its much faster and easier than say roughing up an old Blue Hammer (bring a lunch for that one).
« Last Edit: September 10, 2017, 10:52:00 PM by HackJandy »
Kind of noob when made this account so take advice with grain of salt.