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Author Topic: Brunswick Slide Stone  (Read 18996 times)

charlest

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Brunswick Slide Stone
« on: March 27, 2015, 06:54:35 AM »
This is it:
http://www.bowlwithbrunswick.com/accessories/detail/slide-stone/

This seems to be a new-ish product to add slide to your sole. A teammate showed it to me last night and said it's legal at Nationals (one of the fussiest places) and everywhere.

My question is how does it work.  It seems like a just a hard piece of marble-like material. It must leave no residue for it to be legal all the time.

I'm worried if it works by flattening out any standing fibers on the sole. If it does that, it may flatten them out permanently. I wonder if a nylon brush could restore the sole for the next time when the approaches aren't so slippery.

I don't really want to experiment and destroy $15-20 sole replacements.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

 

Aloarjr810

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Re: Brunswick Slide Stone
« Reply #16 on: March 29, 2015, 03:41:57 PM »
Okay Quick do it yourself slidestone!

1 small piece of wood and a couple of pieces of soapstone:


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charlest

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Re: Brunswick Slide Stone
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2015, 07:00:01 PM »
Okay Quick do it yourself slidestone!

1 small piece of wood and a couple of pieces of soapstone:




So what wood did you use and which glue?
I got some soapstone pieces  and I have lots of wood (amateur woodworker, when the mood hits me).
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

Aloarjr810

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Re: Brunswick Slide Stone
« Reply #18 on: March 29, 2015, 07:35:11 PM »
So what wood did you use and which glue?
I got some soapstone pieces  and I have lots of wood (amateur woodworker, when the mood hits me).

The wood was a piece of cypress 3/4"x1"x1 1/2"

For glue I used some rubber cement (I figured I could peel them back off easy if I had too), and it seems to be holding well.

I got the soapstone at Lowes, 7 pieces for $3.
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charlest

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Re: Brunswick Slide Stone
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2015, 07:48:46 PM »
So what wood did you use and which glue?
I got some soapstone pieces  and I have lots of wood (amateur woodworker, when the mood hits me).

The wood was a piece of cypress 3/4"x1"x1 1/2"

For glue I used some rubber cement (I figured I could peel them back off easy if I had too), and it seems to be holding well.

I got the soapstone at Lowes, 7 pieces for $3.


I got it in the welding section of Home Depot, as was suggested above. I got one piece in a holder (not sure how welders use it) and 3 spare pieces.

I had a piece of pine of an appropriate size, cut my soapstone into the same lengths as the pine using a hacksaw blade (boy, is this stuff soft; it is just solid talcum powder) and used Goop to glue two pieces. Goop is a rubbery cement. I've got it camped now. We'll see in 24 hours how it holds. If it does I have one more piece to cut and glue.

It seems to me that this is just solid talcum powder; the powder comes off with any pressure. I just don't see how this is any more legal than judiciously applied Easy Slide or baby powder (which is just talc or talcum powder.). It seems like you have to be very careful not to get the powder, which you create when you rub the stone, all over, just like the above two items.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."

Aloarjr810

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Re: Brunswick Slide Stone
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2015, 08:37:25 PM »

I got it in the welding section of Home Depot, as was suggested above. I got one piece in a holder (not sure how welders use it) and 3 spare pieces.
Welders, carpenters and others use it for a marker. It holds up under heat and you can still see it. The marks are visible and not permanent.


Quote
It seems to me that this is just solid talcum powder; the powder comes off with any pressure.
Basically that's what it is compressed talc.

 
Quote
I just don't see how this is  than judiciously applied Easy Slide or baby powder (which is just talc or talcum powder.). It seems like you have to be very careful not to get the powder, which you create when you rub the stone, all over, just like the above two items.

As far as the legality, it's not any more legal as those as far as I know.

I think it's safer though,when the stick is just rubbed on the soles it doesn't leave a lot of residue that can get all over the approach like easy slide does.

Now if your shaving it, that's another story it can make a lot of powder. (some guys did that too get a lot powder)
« Last Edit: March 29, 2015, 08:40:38 PM by Aloarjr810 »
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charlest

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Re: Brunswick Slide Stone
« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2015, 09:50:10 PM »
.....

As far as the legality, it's not any more legal as those as far as I know.

I think it's safer though,when the stick is just rubbed on the soles it doesn't leave a lot of residue that can get all over the approach like easy slide does.

Now if your shaving it, that's another story it can make a lot of powder. (some guys did that too get a lot powder)

Yes, I guess rubbing a stone on your shoe is not nearly as messy as a powder, with which some people are very sloppy.

When I sawed my piece, a LOT of powder was released to float to the floor.
"None are so blind as those who will not see."