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Author Topic: Anyone familar with Faball serial numbers?  (Read 7873 times)

MikeE.B.

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Anyone familar with Faball serial numbers?
« on: December 25, 2020, 10:52:03 PM »
I've got a dull purple Hammer. White Faball/Hammer logos. serial number...
                             
                        3B002592
                    made in the usa

Does anyone know which one this is? And when it was made? Thanks-Mike

 

Juggernaut

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Re: Anyone familar with Faball serial numbers?
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2021, 01:58:49 PM »
Only thing you can tell from that is that it was poured in Baltimore in 1993.

Old school urethane with a lightbulb weightblock.

One of the only ones I never owned.
Learn to laugh, and love, and smile, cause we’re only here for a little while.

MikeE.B.

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Re: Anyone familar with Faball serial numbers?
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2021, 08:27:40 AM »
Wow... 1993. Thanks so much! I'd been guessing it was mid-90's. Still a great ball... i use it on all kinds of house and tournament shots.

Ryan Johnston

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Re: Anyone familar with Faball serial numbers?
« Reply #3 on: March 17, 2022, 03:35:42 PM »
I've seen 2 different LOGO's representing "FABALL". One of them is what I've seen researching about a particular Hammer bowling ball. That logo has dots crossed like a cross with fab. I have a hammer manufactured in St. Louis that has been closed for many of years. It has a Cap R with fab in it. Can anyone explain the difference.

MI 2 AZ

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Re: Anyone familar with Faball serial numbers?
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2023, 11:45:32 AM »
I've seen 2 different LOGO's representing "FABALL". One of them is what I've seen researching about a particular Hammer bowling ball. That logo has dots crossed like a cross with fab. I have a hammer manufactured in St. Louis that has been closed for many of years. It has a Cap R with fab in it. Can anyone explain the difference.

From my shaky memory, Faball decided to get into the reactive ball market and on at least one of their reactive balls that I bought, it had a capital R on it to mean Reactive.  I don't remember the year and I no longer own that ball to check the s/n or model.
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bradl

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Re: Anyone familar with Faball serial numbers?
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2023, 12:05:43 PM »
I've seen 2 different LOGO's representing "FABALL". One of them is what I've seen researching about a particular Hammer bowling ball. That logo has dots crossed like a cross with fab. I have a hammer manufactured in St. Louis that has been closed for many of years. It has a Cap R with fab in it. Can anyone explain the difference.

From my shaky memory, Faball decided to get into the reactive ball market and on at least one of their reactive balls that I bought, it had a capital R on it to mean Reactive.  I don't remember the year and I no longer own that ball to check the s/n or model.

This would have been around 1995. Fab was late getting into the reactive resin world because they thought that the technology was a fad and wasn't going to last. If I remember right, the people who developed reactive resin either worked for or presented the idea to Fab, who turned it down. They then took it to Nu-Line, which brought us the XCalibur. Ebonite quickly bought into it and brought us the Turbo/X. Brunswick also did, and brought us the Rhino Pro. I can't remember if the Red or Yellow Sun Storms were reactive or urethane (never threw Storm, and never will).

The only ones that lost out on it was Fab; they went Purple Hammer (1993) and Burgundy Hammer (1994) at that time, then finally got into it with the Hammer/R, or Reactive Hammer. by then, they started their downhill slide as they couldn't compete with resin, let alone Columbia's Ceramicore, which was also starting to take off, with the Aftershock.

BL.